Transitions in lifespan Development

Topics: Autism, Special education, Autism spectrum Pages: 18 (3785 words) Published: October 19, 2014
School of Education Studies Module Cover Sheet

Name of Student: Eibhlín Ní Mhuircheartaigh
ID Number: 59210388

Qualification: M.Sc. Guidance & Counselling
Module: ES551: Wellbeing, Society and Lifelong Learning
Title of Essay/Seminar Paper: Case Study: School struggles of those living with Asperger Syndrome Please indicate the term and academic year this module was studied: Spring 2010 Term:
Autumn  Spring Summer

Academic Year: 2009/2010
Is this a re-submission?
Yes  No
Word length: 2,735

Date of Submission: Day 29 Month 04 Year: 2010 This work is original and has not been submitted for any other assessment Student Signature:…………………………………………. Name of Marker:

Plagiarism Disclaimer:
Signed Declaration
I hereby certify that this material, which I now submit for assessment on the programme of study leading to the award ……………………………………………………………… (insert title of degree for which registered) is entirely my own work and has not been taken from the work of others save and to the extent that such work has been cited and acknowledged within the text of my own work.

Signed & dated:

Dublin City University
(School of Education Studies)

Case Study: School struggles of those living with Asperger Syndrome

By

Eibhlín Ní Mhuircheartaigh
Student number: 59210388

Submitted to the School of Education Studies, Dublin City University, in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the award of the Master in Science in Guidance and Counselling

29/04/10

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………4-5 Case Study…………………………………………………………………………………..6-8 Theoretical Aspects………………………………………………………………………...9-11 Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………..12-13 References………………………………………………………………………………..14-17 Appendix…………………………………………………………………………………18-19

Introduction
As a secondary school teacher it is easily acknowledged that for many students school can be challenging. However, having read “Freaks, Geeks and Asperger Syndrome” by Luke Jackson it occurred to me how school can be particularly challenging for children with special needs, including those with Asperger’s syndrome (AS). They often experience difficulties with social interaction, behaviour problems and have difficulties understanding and adapting to the social demands of school. In his book “Freaks, Geeks and Asperger Syndrome,” Luke Jackson speaks of his experience of school where he “struggled to understand what was going on.” But one thing he did understand was that “most kids were mean to me.” The situation can be further complicated by the fact that there is no typical, predictable classroom style common to all children with special needs, for that matter. It can also be problematic for parents to tell how much of any problem identified by a teacher falls into the normal range of a child’s development, i.e. how much is due to Aspergers, and how much is due to coexisting problem such as learning disability, anxiety disorder, or disruptive behaviour and others. With this knowledge the author was curious to investigate what measures have been taken to include children with such difficulties in main stream education and fully meet their required needs. Has this been successfully achieved?

While the past ten years have seen huge strides in catering for students with special needs in Ireland, challenges still exist to ensure students with special needs are catered for in an appropriate manner. Since 1998, the Department of Education have had ten pieces of legislation passed through the Dáil that relate one way or another to children and special education needs. Under the terms of the Education Act, 1998, the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment has the function of advising the Minister for Education and Science regarding the curriculum and syllabuses for students with a disability or other...


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