Transition to a Professional Nursing

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Transition to a Professional Role
Jennifer Quijano
Florida International University
January 26, 2013

Transition to a Professional Role
Introduction
Nurses who have prepared to assume advanced nursing roles can contribute to the healthcare system through new ideas and insights in education, administration, research, and practice. During the process of further education nurses are exposed to professional socialization, which addresses values, norms and ways of viewing situations that are unique to the profession. This process will later provide the common ground that shapes the way work is conducted. Such process, forces nurses to go through different models of transition that will help them overcome personal and professional challenges that occur while experiencing change. Consequently, helping form the individual’s professional identity, his/her view as a member of a profession with the required knowledge and responsibilities. (Blais & Hayes, 2011).
Models of Transition (Bridges; Spencer & Adams)
Change can make people apprehensive, which can lead them to resist it or oppose it. Considering the challenges and struggles that people experience with change, Bridges and Spencer and Adams describe models of transition.
According to Blais and Hayes (2011) Bridges Model describes a model of transition that consists of three phases: the ending, neutral zone, and new beginnings. There are four components within the ending phase: disengagement, disidentification, disenchantment, and disorientation.
On the other hand, Spencer and Adams developed a model of transition that includes seven stages: losing focus, minimizing the impact, the pit, letting go of the past, testing the limits, searching for meaning, and integration.
These two models of transition describe the internal struggles, and the external influences that occur when people experience change. The first four stages of Spencer and Adams’ model of transition is similar to Bridges’ ending phase,



References: Blais, K., & Hayes, J. S. (2011). Professional nursing practice, concepts and perspectives. (Sixth ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Choi, J. (June 2012). Comparative Assessment of Informatics Competencies in Three Undergraduate Programs. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics (OJNI), vol. 16 (2). Retrieved from http://ojni.org/issues/?p= 1700

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