TOURISM CREATES SOCIAL PROBLEMS

Topics: Indigenous Australians, Tourism, Kimberley Pages: 22 (7482 words) Published: June 10, 2014
This article was downloaded by: [123.243.217.115]
On: 21 May 2014, At: 05:26
Publisher: Routledge
Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK Australian Geographer
Publication details, including instructions for authors and
subscription information:
http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/cage20
Environmental and Cultural
Implications of Visitor Access in the
Kimberley Region, Australia
Pascal Scherrer a , Amanda J. Smith b , Martin Randall b & Ross Dowling c
a Centre for Tourism, Leisure and Work, School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Southern Cross University, Lismore,
Australia and Centre for Ecosystem Management, School of
Natural Sciences , Edith Cowan University , Joondalup, Australia b Social Research Unit, Parks and Visitor Services, Department of Environment and Conservation , Kensington, Australia
c School of Marketing, Tourism and Leisure, Edith Cowan
University , Joondalup, Australia
Published online: 30 Aug 2011.
To cite this article: Pascal Scherrer , Amanda J. Smith , Martin Randall & Ross Dowling (2011) Environmental and Cultural Implications of Visitor Access in the Kimberley Region, Australia, Australian Geographer, 42:3, 257-271, DOI: 10.1080/00049182.2011.595766 To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049182.2011.595766 PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE

Taylor & Francis makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of all the information (the “Content”) contained in the publications on our platform. However, Taylor & Francis, our agents, and our licensors make no representations or warranties whatsoever as to the accuracy, completeness, or suitability for any purpose of the Content. Any opinions and views expressed in this publication are the opinions and views of the authors, and are not the views of or endorsed by Taylor & Francis. The accuracy of the Content should not be relied upon and should be independently verified with primary sources of information. Taylor and Francis shall not be liable for any losses, actions, claims, proceedings, demands, costs, expenses, damages, and other liabilities whatsoever or howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly in connection with, in relation to or arising out of the use of the Content.

This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes. Any substantial or systematic reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly forbidden. Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found at http://www.tandfonline.com/page/termsand- conditions

Downloaded by [123.243.217.115] at 05:26 21 May 2014
Environmental and Cultural Implications of
Visitor Access in the Kimberley Region,
Australia
PASCAL SCHERRER, AMANDA J. SMITH, MARTIN RANDALL
& ROSS DOWLING, Centre for Tourism, Leisure and Work, School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia and Centre for Ecosystem Management, School of Natural Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia; Social Research Unit, Parks and Visitor Services, Department of Environment and Conservation, Kensington, Australia; Social Research Unit, Parks and Visitor Services, Department of Environment and Conservation, Kensington, Australia; School of Marketing, Tourism and Leisure, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia ABSTRACT The Kimberley coast in Australia’s far north-west is the traditional country and home of a number of Indigenous groups and hosts some of the country’s richest cultural heritage, most spectacular rock art, scenery and wildlife, making it an attractive tourism destination. A growing expedition cruise industry provides the main means of visitor access to remote coastal sites and offers excursions to shore-based attractions in what are mostly Aboriginal Reserve lands. In light of concerns about environmental and cultural site...

References: BLUNDELL, V. (2003) ‘The art of country: aesthetics, place and Aboriginal identity in northwest
Australia’, in Trigger, D
BLUNDELL, V. & WOOLAGOODJA, D. (2005) Keeping the Wandjinas fresh, Fremantle Arts
Centre Press, Fremantle.
BRATTON, S., HICKLER, M. & GRAVES, J. (1977) Trail and campsite erosion survey for Great
Smoky Mountains National Park, Part III: the condition of trails, Management Report No.
BROWN, T.J. (1990) ‘Antecedents of culturally significant tourist behaviour’, Annals of
Tourism Research 26(3), pp
BURDGE, R. (2004) The concepts, process and methods of social impact assessment, Social
Ecology Press, Middleton, WI.
BUREAU OF METEOROLOGY (2010) Climate averages for station 1009 Kuri Bay & 1012
Mitchell Plateau, available from: www.bom.gov.au (accessed 16 March 2010).
CASTLEDEN, H., GARVIN, T. & HUU-AY-AHT FIRST NATION (2009) ‘‘‘Hishuk Tsawak’’
(Everything is one/connected): A Huu-ay-aht worldview for seeing forestry in British
COLE, D.N. (1983) Assessing and monitoring backcountry trail conditions, Research Paper INT-
303, US Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range
COLE, D.N. (1990) ‘Ecological impacts of wilderness recreation and their management’, in
Hendee, J.C., Stankey, G.H
COLLINS, J.H. (2008) ‘Marine tourism in the Kimberley region of Western Australia’,
Geographical Research 46(1), pp
DHIMURRU (2004) A visitor’s guide: recreation areas*north east Arnhem Land, Dhimurru
Land Management Aboriginal Corporation, Darwin.
DIA (2010) Permit to enter a reserve, Department of Indigenous Affairs, Perth.
DOOHAN, K. (2008) Making things come good: relations between Aborigines and miners at Argyle.
DOWLING, R. & PFORR, C. (eds) (2009) Coastal tourism development, Cognizant Communication
Corporation, New York.
DREDGE, D. (2006) ‘Networks, conflict and collaborative communities’, Journal of
Sustainable Tourism 14(6), pp
FORTIN, M.-J. & GAGNON, C. (1999) ‘An assessment of social impacts of national parks on
communities in Quebec, Canada’, Environmental Conservation 26(3), pp
HAMMITT, W.E. & COLE, D.N. (1998) Wildland recreation: ecology and management (2nd
edition, Volume 2), John Wiley, New York.
HERCOCK,M. (1999) ‘The impacts of recreation and tourism in the remote North Kimberly
region of Western Australia’, The Environmentalist 19(3), pp
HOLDEN, A. (2009) ‘An introduction to tourism_environment relationships’, in Hill, J. &
Gale, T
HOWITT, R. (2003) ‘Local and non-specialist participation in impact assessment’, in Liu,
C.-Q., Zhao, Z., Xiao, T
KIMBERLEY LAND COUNCIL (2005) Kimberley natural resource management draft report as at
27 May 2005, Kimberley Land Council, Derby.
KING, D. & STEWART, W. (1996) ‘Ecotourism and commodification: protecting people and
places’, Biodiversity and Conservation 5(3), pp
LANGTON,M. (2001) ‘Dominion and dishonour: A treaty between our nations?’, Postcolonial
Studies 4(1), pp
LEUNG, Y. & MARION, J.L. (1996) ‘Trail degradation as influenced by environmental
factors: a state-of-the-knowledge review’, Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 51, pp.
LEUNG, Y. & MARION, J.L. (1998) ‘The influence of sampling interval on the accuracy of
trail impact assessment’, Landscape and Urban Planning 43(4), pp
LEUNG, Y. & MARION, J.L. (1999) ‘Assessing trail conditions in protected areas: application
of a problem-assessment method in great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA’,
LEUNG, Y. & MARION, J.L. (2000) ‘Recreation impacts and management in wilderness: a
state-of-knowledge review’, paper presented at the Wilderness Science in a Time of
LIDDLE, M. (1997) Recreation ecology: the ecological impact of outdoor recreation and ecotourism,
Chapman & Hall, London.
LUZ, F. (2000) ‘Participatory landscape ecology: a basis for acceptance and implementation’,
Landscape and Urban Planning 50(1_3), pp
MCNIVEN, I.J. & RUSSELL, L. (2005) Appropriated pasts: Indigenous peoples and the colonial
culture of archaeology, AltaMira Press, Lanham, MD.
MENDE, P. & NEWSOME, D. (2006) ‘The assessment, monitoring and management of hiking
trails: a case study from the Stirling Range National Park, Western Australia’, Conservation
MYERS, F.R. (1982) ‘Always ask: resource use and land ownership among Pintupi
Aborigines of the Australian western desert’, in Williams, N
NADASDY, P. (1999) ‘The politics of TEK: power and the ‘‘integration’’ of knowledge’, Arctic
Anthropology 36(1/2), pp
O’FAIRCHEALLAIGH, C. (1999) ‘Making social impact assessment count: A negotiationbased
approach for indigenous peoples’, Society and Natural Resources 12, pp
PEARSON, N. (1997) ‘The Concept of Native Title at Common Law’, in Yunupingu, G. (ed)
Our Land is Our Life, Land Rights _ Past, Present and Future, Australian Humanities Review
ROSE, D.B. (1996) Nourishing terrains: Australian Aboriginal views of landscape and wilderness,
Australian Heritage Commission, Canberra.
ROSE, D.B. (2002) Country of heart: an Indigenous Australian homeland, Aboriginal Studies
Press, Canberra.
ROSS, H. (1991) ‘Controlling access to environment and self: Aboriginal perspectives on
tourism’, Australian Psychologist 26(3), pp
SCHERRER, P. (2010) Cruise passenger numbers*2006 season, unpublished data, Southern
Cross University, Lismore.
SCHERRER, P., SMITH, A.J. & DOWLING, R. (2008) Tourism and the Kimberley coastal
waterways: a review of environmental and cultural aspects of expedition cruising along the
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Social Problems Essay
  • Social problems Essay
  • social problems paper immigration
  • Social problem essay
  • Alcoholism: A Social Problem Essay
  • Tourism Essay
  • tourism Essay
  • tourism Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free