Tolstoy's Hadji Murad

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6/16/12

Hadji Murad / Leo Tolstoy

Hadji Murad by Leo Tolstoy
Translated by Louise and Aylmer Maude eBooks@Adelaide 2010

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This web edition published by eBooks@Adelaide. Rendered into HTML by Steve Thomas. Last updated Sun Aug 29 19:45:31 2010. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Licence (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/au/). You are free: to copy, distribute, display, and perform the work, and to make derivative works under the following conditions: you must attribute the work in the manner specified by the licensor; you may not use this work for commercial purposes; if you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under a license identical to this one. For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. Any of these conditions can be waived if you get permission from the licensor. Your fair use and other rights are in no way affected by the above. eBooks@Adelaide The University of Adelaide Library University of Adelaide South Australia 5005

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TABLE OF CONT ENT S
Chapter I Chapter II Chapter III Chapter IV Chapter V Chapter VI Chapter VII Chapter VIII Chapter IX Chapter X Chapter XI Chapter XII Chapter XIII Chapter XIV Chapter XV Chapter XVI Chapter XVII Chapter XVIII Chapter XIX Chapter XX Chapter XXI Chapter XXII ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/t/tolstoy/leo/t65h/complete.html 3/124

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Chapter XXIII Chapter XXIV Chapter XXV A List of Tartar Words Used in HADJI MURAD

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CHAPT ER I
I was returning home by the fields. It was midsummer, the hay harvest was over and they were

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