To what extent was the NAACP responsible for the successes of the civil rights campaign? (1945-57)

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To what extent was the NAACP responsible for the successes of the civil rights campaign? (1945-57)

The NAACP was a major civil rights groups and had many successes, especially in the period 1945-57. They mainly did this through legal cases, supporting individuals and groups gain their rights, and supporting the use of economic means to beat segregation. On the other hand, it could be argued that there were many other bodies responsible for the successes of the civil rights movement, such as the individual people involved in isolated incidents, and those who, independently from the NAACP, marched and gave up their time, safety and money to fight for the rights of African Americans, such as the various other civil right groups, students, and many other people. Also, the government and the president also passed the amendments, legislations and supported these campaigns, so the NAACP were not solely responsible.

The NAACP clearly played a major role in many of the successes of the civil rights campaign in this period. This is evident by their involvement in a series of legal cases regarding civil rights issues, such as their landmark legal case: Brown vs. Board of Education, Topeka. This case ruled that segregated schools were, in fact, not ‘separate but equal’ and they did this by referencing the 14th and 15th Amendment in many of his arguments and showing that children at white-only schools in the south had nearly $38 spent on each one of them per year, while the equivalent at a black-only school only had $13 spent on them. Thurgood Marshall, Legal Counsel for the NAACP, also brought in educationalists, psychologists and other professionals, proving that segregated schools caused psychological damage to black students by making them feel inferior. They were responsible for the success as this set a precedent for the subsequent legal cases, and drove forward the campaign for civil rights by boosting morale. Another important case supported by the NAACP was the

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