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To What Extent Was the Federal Government Responsible for Improving the Status of Black People in the Usa in the Years on 1945-64?

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To What Extent Was the Federal Government Responsible for Improving the Status of Black People in the Usa in the Years on 1945-64?
History. Mr Lowish. Pursuing life and liberty: Equality in the U.S.A 1945-68. Keelin Scholes.

To what extent was the federal government responsible for improving the status of black people in the United States of America in the years of 1945-64?

The Civil Rights Movement as we know it started in 1945 due to the end of the second World War. After the racial atrocities carried out by the Nazis killing over 6 million Jews it showed how far racial abuse can be taken and convinced many people that racism should be opposed in all circumstances. There were clear signs of change for black Americans however progress was not equally shared across the united states. The Federal Government which is headed by the President, but also comprises congress and the supreme court each had a role to play in dismantling segregation. As well as the Federal Government there were other factors that attempted improving the status of black people in the U.S which are peaceful protests, and legal groups such as the NAACP (national association for the advancement of coloured people) and to conclude, analyze which group responded to change effectively and re-address the question.

Firstly the 4 presidents in this time period were Harry Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. They each have different attitudes towards civil rights. Truman was born in the border state of Missouri and as a result experienced segregation first hand. As a young man Truman was racist, he used abusive language referring to African Americans as niggers. In addition at the age of 38 he paid $10 to join the KU KLUX KLAN, but Truman outgrew his prejudices and became the first American President to publicly challenge segregation and the first to pledge his support for civil rights. In 1946 Truman established the Presidents Committee on Civil Rights. He commissioned them to produce a report examining the experience of racial minorities in America. The report ‘to secure these rights’

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