Preview

To what extent was Elizabeth s foreign policy between 1588 and 1603 an expensive failure

Satisfactory Essays
Open Document
Open Document
888 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
To what extent was Elizabeth s foreign policy between 1588 and 1603 an expensive failure
To what extent was Elizabeth’s foreign policy between 1588 and 1603 an expensive failure? (45 marks)

Introduction

Define key term ‘expensive failure’ – Foreign policy being an expensive failure would be defined as Elizabeth spending a lot of money on expeditions and war in foreign countries, which England couldn’t really afford. This would be a failure if all the money spent had equalled in very little positive outcome
Define criteria of what an ‘expensive failure’ would entail – for foreign policy to be an expensive failure, Elizabeth would have had to spend high amounts of money on foreign affairs which had then equalled in little positive outcome and instead failed, due to not meeting the aims of her foreign policy in each country for example loosing at war, loosing money on expeditions and war being ended with a peace treaty instead
Judgement – even though there was some success in Elizabeth’s foreign policy, such as defeating the Spanish armada, however this was out balanced by many failures Elizabeth’s foreign policy entailed, such as one of her main aims for Spain to have no control in the Netherlands. Even though she did have some success in her foreign policy, this was still highly expensive, which could question if a success was this expensive, is it in fact a failure instead.
Historiography – Tilbrook: “In the end little had been achieved at a very great cost.”
Synoptic – Foreign policy was less of an expensive failure during

Netherlands

Aims – now England was at wars with Spain, Elizabeth didn’t want the Spanish to even have loose control any more, but to be completely out of the Netherlands, therefore the Netherlands could be made more protestant
Was an expensive failure
Southern part of the Netherlands was still under Catholic control
War cost England £s million
Wasn’t an expensive failure
Northern Netherlands was now protestant
Spain weren’t fully in control of the Netherlands
Doran: “ Ultimately Elizabeth’s objectives were achieved” however

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Dutch Republic Dbq

    • 1517 Words
    • 7 Pages

    From the middle of the Seventeenth Century to the early Eighteenth Century, the Dutch Republic, which in 1648 had it’s independence recognized in the Peace of Westphalia, was an important commercial and military presence in Western Europe which later experienced challenges to its security, unity, and prosperity: in security, the Dutch faced navel challenges from England and land-based invasions from France; the challenges to prosperity came from the cost of wars and fierce competition to it’s trading empire; in turn, the financial stress caused by war and commercial decline threatened the unity of the Republic, as the financial burden of the wars fell disproportionately on the province of Holland.…

    • 1517 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The English Foreign Policy from 1515 to 1528 can often be described as incoherent; this is because the aims of foreign policy from 1515 to 1529 kept altering due to the change in balance of power in Europe. This meant that for England to keep acting as the centre for European affair the foreign policy would have to keep changing. A result of this was that the foreign policy seemed ineffective due to lack of structure, the high costs, and few territorial acquisitions was the traditional opinion on the foreign policy that it was a failure. However with all of these mentioned factors the foreign policy could also have been seen as very effective. This was due to its ability to adapt to situations that arose in the period 1515 to 1529. If you break down this time period into smaller sections you can look at them individually and see where the foreign policy was effective on a smaller scale. When looking at this way it is easier to get a bigger picture as to how effective the foreign policy actually was.…

    • 3141 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Source C’s disagreement with the suggestion that Henry and Wolsey conducted an effective foreign policy in the years 1515-30 is also backed up with source A as source A says “Although there were some obvious large scale failures, especially between 1515-25 and 1529” source A also is partly talking about the failure of the amicable grant which resulted in England being sidelined from European affairs.…

    • 768 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Firstly I believe that Henry VIII's foreign policy was an overall failure, for various reasons. Henry VIII's foreign policy was to be drastically different to that of his predecessor and father, Henry VII. Where Henry VII's foreign policy was very reserved and almost non existent due to the need to rebuild the stability of his own country and his complete lack of resources and money at the time, Henry VIII's was completely the opposite. As Henry was born into wealth and security he didn't quite have the same morals as his father, and wanted to be the heroic, chivalrous night like Edward V. He wanted England to regain glory, power and status in Europe and with his aggressive foreign policy he was completely and utterly prepared to go to war for this, and that's what he did. However Henry VIII was not powerful enough to go it alone and he needed to pick and ally. He joined with the Holy League, which consisted of Spain, the Holy Roman Empire and the Pope and in June 1512 invaded a France. This seemed like a great idea with Henry now being allied against his enemy France with power like Spain, however this first attempt turned about to be a disaster. Ferdinand of Spain manipulated him and used his his attack on Northern France as a distraction so they could attack Navarre. Henry's men were left dejected, diseased and mutinous forcing retreat. So, due to Henry VIII's naivety his foreign policy is so far unsuccessful. Nevertheless, Henry was mostly unperturbed and determined and invaded Northern France again in June…

    • 1006 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    In 1812, after the Napoleonic wars, Britain was left in a state of great economic depression and was in debt of around £834 million, despite moral being high after Victory against Napoleon. Lord Liverpool and his government faced the momentous task of carrying Britain through a time of depression but also keeping up with the vast industrialisation that was spreading across the country.…

    • 755 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Rice, George P. Jr., The Public Speaking of Queen Elizabeth: Selection from her Official Addresses…

    • 1742 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Ch 24 Study Guide Copy

    • 419 Words
    • 2 Pages

    10. What caused the disintegration of the Dutch overseas empire and what lands did the British gain as a result? p.641…

    • 419 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    William Cecil’s influence touched on just about all aspects of policy that occurred during Elizabeth’s long reign. In the Royal Court he brought order and stability. Cecil was also highly influential in foreign policy. He saw France and Spain as threats to. It has also been argued that Cecil was not just the provider of advice and executor of the Queens wishes but also that he could have been the power behind the throne. Plenty of evidence has come to light that suggests that the Secretary regularly attempted to manipulate Elizabeth however it would be inaccurate to assume that all of Cecil’s personal agendas were fruitful, Elizabeth could make her own mind up and often did so. Although Cecil was a prominent figure during this time, Elizabeth was still the person who ruled the country and had her own ideas on how to run the country. Elizabeth was firmly in control of major policies and on many occasions obstinately ignored the Councils advice. The Council conscientiously carried out the Queens wishes even when it had advised otherwise. There is general agreement that, until its decline in the 1590s central government under Elizabeth was successful and that the Queen provided firm direction. According to Neale Parliament was another aspect that had influence over decision making in Elizabeth government He argues that the power of the House of Commons increased throughout Elizabeth’s reign. The number of conflicts Elizabeth had with individual MPs and the problems which the Stuarts experienced with Parliament are evidence for this. These developments were brought by the “Puritan Choir “who deliberately planned confrontations to force the issue of parliamentary privilege versus the royal prerogative. It is therefore necessary to investigate not only to what extent Cecil was involved in the decision making process but also the influence of the Parliament on Elizabeth and ultimately the decisions that were taken through this time of how many were Elizabeth’s own ideas.…

    • 326 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Franco-Dutch War Analysis

    • 986 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Franco-Dutch War, commonly referred to simply as the Dutch War, was a conflict in which France attacked the Spanish Netherlands (1), a territory in the Low Countries controlled by Spain (2). In 1670, England and France signed the Treaty of Dover, uniting them against the Dutch (1). When French forces under Louis XIV invaded the Netherlands, Dutch armies flooded vast portions of the country by opening the dikes, impeding French movement. William III of Orange, the Dutch monarch, oversaw the naval defense of key Dutch regions. Sweden united with France in gaining territory in the Spanish Netherlands and on the Rhine River. With assistance from Spain, the Holy Roman Empire, and Lorraine, the Dutch successfully resisted further French advancement.…

    • 986 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ap Euro Dutch Republic Dbq

    • 1220 Words
    • 5 Pages

    European nations, sometimes in united effort, tried and succeeded in causing the Dutch problems. The table displaying the number of seized ships during the Angle-Dutch Wars is a clear example of this challenge that the Dutch had to face (doc. 3). By looking at the table, it is evident that into the late 17th century, the British were surpassing the Dutch, which was gradually losing security in not only numbers, but also in superiority as a naval power. In 1671, the Dutch decided to address the growing problem, revealing through the Amsterdam City Council their opinions that their neighboring countries were indeed targeting their trade and power (doc. 7). This implied how there was a united European effort to challenge the Dutch, and the city council, as the highest decision-making authority in the Dutch Republic, could come this reliable conclusion, because they were directly involved in the nation’s trading affairs and could correctly analyze the situation. Because of this, the council showed how the Dutch were truly threatened by the rest of Europe. This threat seemed to have made its impact, as the national debt is shown to have increased more than three-fold from 1688 to 1713 (doc. 12). This may have been…

    • 1220 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    ‘How far was Henrys foreign policy merely defensive in the years between 1487 and 1509?’ (24 marks)…

    • 638 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    An effective foreign policy could be described as making alliances, gaining land with beneficial resources and wealth, and not getting invaded, all of which Edward succeeded whilst having Northumberland as his advisor. During the period of 1547-1549, Edward’s regent, Somerset, created a rather unsuccessful and ineffective foreign policy, with him not gaining an alliance with France and his Scottish foreign policy failing. Somerset did try to gain an alliance with Scotland, which would have gained security benefits for Edward, because he was a minor and with Mary Stuart marrying the French heir, France had an opportunity to challenge England’s regency government. However, peace would have been better for the economy and stability during the royal minority, rather than an active foreign policy. Heard argues that Somerset really had to take up the war against Scotland left by Henry VIII in order to see it through to its end, the marriage of Edward VI and Mary Stuart. However, Houlbrooke disagrees and believes Somerset intended that his great achievement would be the Scottish marriage and then he would hold Scotland with permanent garrisons of English and mercenary troops; he did not have to follow Henry VIII’s policy. Overall, Somerset’s foreign policy had politically failed because his obsession with Scotland had influenced him to delay dealing…

    • 1806 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Were the difficulties faced by Charles II due more to financial concerns than foreign policy in the years 1667-1678?…

    • 1433 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The eighteenth century witnessed a large number of expensive and drawn-out wars. Who was attempting to alter the balance of power? Were the causes of these wars economic or political?…

    • 301 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays