To Kill A Mockingbird Quote

Topics: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, Bankruptcy in the United States Pages: 11 (6690 words) Published: December 3, 2014
To Kill A Mockingbird Quotes
Directions: Know who said the quote, who is being spoken to, the significance of the quote to the novel or characterization. 1. “Being Southerners, it was a source of shame to some members of the family that we had no recorded ancestors on either side of the Battle of Hastings” (Chapter 1, pg. 3). 2. “He [Atticus] liked Maycomb, he was Maycomb County born and bred; he knew his people, they knew him, and because of Simon Finch’s industry, Atticus was related by blood or marriage to nearly every family in the town” (Chapter 1, pg. 5). 3. “Maycomb was an old town, but it was a tired old town when I first knew it. In rainy weather the streets turned to red slop; grass grew on the sidewalks, the courthouse sagged in the square. Somehow, it was hotter then: a black dog suffered on a summer’s day’ bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square. Men’s stiff collars wilted by nine in the morning. Ladies bathed before noon, after three-o’clock naps, and by nightfall were like soft teacakes with frosting of sweat and sweet talcum. People moved slowly then. They ambled across the square, shuffled in and out of the stores around it, took their time about everything. A day was twenty-four hours long but seemed longer. There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go, nothing to buy and no money to buy it with, nothing to see outside the boundaries of Maycomb County” (Chapter 1, pg. 5). 4. “Dill was from Meridian, Mississippi, was spending the summer with his aunt, Miss Rachel, and would be spending every summer in Maycomb from now on. His family was from Maycomb Country originally, his mother worked for a photographer in Meridian” (Chapter 1, 7). 5. “The mystery of the house began many years before Jem and I were born. The Radleys, welcome anywhere in town, kept to themselves, a predilection unforgivable in Maycomb. They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal recreation, but worshiped at home; Mrs. Radley seldom if ever crossed the street for a mid-morning coffee break with her neighbors, and certainly never joined a missionary circle. Mr. Radley walked to town at eleven-thirty every morning and came back promptly at twelve, sometimes carrying a brown paper bag that the neighborhood assumed contained the family groceries. I never knew how old Mr. Radley made his living—Jem said he ‘bought cotton,’ a polite term for doing nothing—but Mr. Radley and his wife had lived there with their two sons as long as anybody could remember. The shutters and doors of the Radley house were closed on Sundays, another thing alien to Maycomb’s ways: closed doors meant illness and cold weather only. Of all days Sunday was the day for formal afternoon visiting: ladies wore corsets, men wore coats, children wore shoes. But to climb the Radley front steps and call, ‘He-y,’ of a Sunday afternoon was something their neighbors never did. The Radley house had no screen doors. I once asked Atticus if it ever had any; Atticus said yes, but before I was born” (Chapter 1, 9). 6. “The judge decided to send the boys [Radley’s] to the state industrial school, where boys were sometimes sent for no other reason than to provide them with food and decent shelter: it was no prison and it was no disgrace. Mr. Radley thought it was. If the judge released Arthur, Mr. Radley would see to it that Arthur gave no further trouble. Knowing that Mr. Radley’s word was his bond, judge was glad to do so” (Chapter 1, 10). 7. “According to Miss Stephanie, Boo was sitting in the livingroom cutting some items from The Maycomb Tribune to paste in his scrapbook. His father entered the room. As Mr. Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out, wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities. Mrs. Radley ran screaming into the street that Arthur was killing them all, but when the sheriff arrived he found Boo still sitting in the livingroom,...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • To Kill a Mockingbird Quotes Essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Quotes Essay
  • Essay on To Kill a Mockingbird
  • In To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird and Malcolm X's Quote Essay
  • "To Kill a Mockingbird" Quotes and Notes Essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Quote Analysis Essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Quote Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free