top-rated free essay

To Kill a Mockingbird

By snackshome Apr 14, 2013 1274 Words
o kill a mockingbird * ------------------------------------------------- NARRATOR IN TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

* -------------------------------------------------
Take turns reading the passage from To Kill a Mockingbird out loud to each other (from chapter 17, pp. 186-18 9) √
* -------------------------------------------------
What kind of narrator do we find in this extract – and thus in the entire novel? How can you tell?

Ar first we thought the narrator was omniscient, but we later figured that since the narrator talks directly to us, as if we was right in front of him/her, it would be a obtrusive third-person narrator. We can tell that from the quote:

* -------------------------------------------------
“We also saw no resemblance to his namesake. A shock of wispy new-washed hair stood up from his forehead; his nose was thin, pointed, and shiny; he had no chin to speak of-it seemed to be part of his creepy neck”. * -------------------------------------------------



1. -------------------------------------------------
What is the effect of this type of narrator in the passage? * -------------------------------------------------
Intimacy.

2. -------------------------------------------------
What is the effect of this type of narrator in To Kill a Mockingbird as a whole? i. -------------------------------------------------

* -------------------------------------------------
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

2.

From Harper Lee: To Kill a Mockingbird (chapter 17)
* -------------------------------------------------

* -------------------------------------------------
Atticus sat down and nodded to the circuit solicitor, who shook his head at the judge, who nodded to Mr. Tate, who rose stiffly and stepped down from the witness stand. * -------------------------------------------------

Below us, heads turned, feet scraped the floor, babies were shifted to shoulders, and a few children scampered out of the courtroom. The Negroes behind us whispered softly among themselves; Dill was asking Reverend Sykes what it was all about, but Reverend Sykes said he didn't know. So far, things were utterly dull: nobody had thundered, there were no arguments between opposing counsel, there was no drama; a grave disappointment to all present, it seemed. Atticus was proceeding amiably, as if he were involved in a title dispute. With his infinite capacity for calming turbulent seas, he could make a rape case as dry as a sermon. Gone was the terror in my mind of stale whiskey and barnyard smells, of sleepy-eyed sullen men, of a husky voice calling in the night, "Mr. Finch? They gone?" Our nightmare had gone with daylight; everything would come out all right. * -------------------------------------------------

All the spectators were as relaxed as Judge Taylor, except Jem. His mouth was twisted into a purposeful half-grin, and his eyes happy about, and he said something about corroborating evidence, which made me sure he was showing off. * -------------------------------------------------

". . . Robert E. Lee Ewell!"
* -------------------------------------------------
In answer to the clerk's booming voice, a little bantam cock of a man rose and strutted to the stand, the back of his neck reddening at the sound of his name. When he turned around to take the oath, we saw that his face was as red as his neck. We also saw no resemblance to his namesake. A shock of wispy new-washed hair stood up from his forehead; his nose was thin, pointed, and shiny; he had no chin to speak of-it seemed to be part of his crepey neck. * -------------------------------------------------

"-so help me God," he crowed.
* -------------------------------------------------
Every town the size of Maycomb had families like the Ewells. No economic fluctuations changed their status people like the Ewells lived as guests of the county in prosperity as well as in the depths of a depression. No truant officers could keep their numerous offspring in school; no public health officer could free them from congenital defects, various worms, and the diseases indigenous to filthy surroundings. * -------------------------------------------------

Maycomb's Ewells lived behind the town garbage dump in what was once a Negro cabin. The cabin's plank walls were supplemented with sheets of corrugated iron, its roof shingled with tin cans hammered flat, so only its general shape suggested its original design: square, with four tiny rooms opening onto a shotgun hall, the cabin rested uneasily upon four irregular lumps of limestone. Its windows were merely open spaces in the walls, which in the summertime were covered with greasy strips of cheesecloth to keep out the varmints that feasted on Maycomb's refuse. The varmints had a lean time of it, for the Ewells gave the dump a thorough gleaning every day, and the fruits of their industry (those that were not eaten) made the plot of ground around the cabin look like the playhouse of an insane child: what passed for a fence was bits of tree limbs, broomsticks and tool shafts, all tipped with rusty hammer-heads, snaggle-toothed rake heads, shovels, axes and grubbing hoes, held on with pieces of barbed wire. Enclosed by this barricade was a dirty yard containing the remains of a Model-T Ford (on blocks), a discarded dentist's chair, an ancient icebox, plus lesser items: old shoes, worn-out table radios, picture frames, and fruit jars, under which scrawny orange chickens pecked hopefully. * -------------------------------------------------

One corner of the yard, though, bewildered Maycomb. Against the fence, in a line, were six chipped-enamel slop jars holding brilliant red geraniums, cared for as tenderly as if they belonged to Miss Maudie Atkinson, had Miss Maudie deigned to permit a geranium on her premises. People said they were Mayella Ewell's. * -------------------------------------------------

Nobody was quite sure how many children were on the place. Some people said six, others said nine; there were always several dirty-faced ones at the windows when anyone passed by. Nobody had occasion to pass by except at Christmas, when the churches delivered baskets, and when the mayor of Maycomb asked us to please help the garbage collector by dumping our own trees and trash. * -------------------------------------------------

Atticus took us with him last Christmas when he complied with the mayor's request. A dirt road ran from the highway past the dump, down to a small Negro settlement some five hundred yards beyond the Ewells'. It was necessary either to back out to the highway or go the full length of the road and turn around; most people turned around in the Negroes' front yards. In the frosty December dusk, their cabins looked neat and snug with pale blue smoke rising from the chimneys and doorways glowing amber from the fires inside. There were delicious smells about: chicken, bacon frying crisp as the twilight air. Jem and I detected squirrel cooking, but it took an old countryman like Atticus to identify possum and rabbit, aromas that vanished when we rode back past the Ewell residence. * -------------------------------------------------

All the little man on the witness stand had that made him any better than his nearest neighbors was, that if scrubbed with lye soap in very hot water, his skin was white. * -------------------------------------------------

"Mr. Robert Ewell?" asked Mr. Gilmer.
* -------------------------------------------------
"That's m'name, cap'n," said the witness.
* -------------------------------------------------
Mr. Gilmer's back stiffened a little, and I felt sorry for him. Perhaps I'd better explain something now. I've heard that lawyers' children, on seeing their parents in court in the heat of argument, get the wrong idea: they think opposing counsel to be the personal enemies of their parents, they suffer agonies, and are surprised to see them often go out arm-in-arm with their tormenters during the first recess. This was not true of Jem and me. We acquired no traumas from watching our father win or lose. I'm sorry that I can't provide any drama in this respect; if I did, it would not be true. We could tell, however, when debate became more acrimonious than professional, but this was from watching lawyers other than our father. I never heard Atticus raise his voice in my life, except to a deaf witness. Mr. Gilmer was doing his job, as Atticus was doing his. Besides, Mr. Ewell was Mr. Gilmer's witness, and he had no business being rude to him of all people. * -------------------------------------------------

* -------------------------------------------------

* -------------------------------------------------

* -------------------------------------------------

Cite This Document

Related Documents

  • To Kill a Mockingbird

    ...because of its meager efforts for racial equality. The South is well known for being a stronghold of reactionary principles and in To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee composed an earnest tale focused on the lives of two children in Maycomb County. The consistent bigotry exposed in the narrative reveal a principle that African Americans did not rec...

    Read More
  • To Kill a Mockingbird

    ...Firsthand Experiences The amount of technology in this world is amazing and where we are in this era is incredible. As technology gets into the minds of children they seem to learn faster than before. It takes minutes for children to understand where adults never really grasp what they hold in their hands. In To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee u...

    Read More
  • To Kill a Mockingbird

    ...To kill a mockingbird theme essay The book “to kill a mockingbird,” written by Harper Lee, uses the mockingbird to symbolize innocence. There are people in widely different situations who are innocent, such as Jem and Scout, Tom Robinson, and Arthur “Boo” Radley. The story takes place in a small town called Maycomb, in Alabama. There...

    Read More
  • To Kill a Mockingbird.

    ...Jean Louise "Scout" Finch makes several progressions as a character from the beginning of the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" to the end of part one. When Scout is introduced, she is shown as being a rude, hot-headed, quick-tempered little girl who sees nothing wrong with beating up the person who does her wrong. As she grows, she turns into a you...

    Read More
  • To Kill a Mockingbird

    ...To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, reveals the development of Jem's character throughout the novel. The reader watches Jem undergo a metamorphosis during the three years that the novel spans. Boo Radley, Jem's family, and the Tom Robinson trial, shape Jem into what he becomes by the end of the book. At the beginning of the novel, Jem was...

    Read More
  • To Kill a Mockingbird

    ...unthinkable to many citizens of the United States today. Although a society where these restrictions are customary is immoral and oppressive, before the 1930s, it was widely accepted. In the late 1920s and early 1930s many women began to make a strong effort to gain rights in The United States of America. Because of the efforts of these women, ...

    Read More
  • To Kill a mockingbird

    ... The “monstrous” controversy of nurture versus nature in Frankenstein What makes a person who they are? Is it written in their genetic code or is it their experiences and upbringing? This age old debate about nurture versus nature is explored in the gothic novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley about a m...

    Read More
  • To Kill a Mockingbird

    ...To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel set in the Southern United States during the 1930’s. Although also present in the Northern United States at that time , racial discrimination and prejudice against black people was much more prevalent in the South , and was not against the law. Black people were originally taken by force from Africa to America ...

    Read More

Discover the Best Free Essays on StudyMode

Conquer writer's block once and for all.

High Quality Essays

Our library contains thousands of carefully selected free research papers and essays.

Popular Topics

No matter the topic you're researching, chances are we have it covered.