TMA03 DD101 Using the data in the table provided, what can you say about the ethnicity of the population in the national parks of England and Wales?

Topics: United Kingdom, Ethnic group, Minority group Pages: 5 (1482 words) Published: August 11, 2014
TMA03 DD101 APRIL 2014.
Question 1
Using the data in the table provided, what can you say about the ethnicity of the population in the national parks of England and Wales?

The table provided shows the results of the 2011 Census and the distribution of multiple ethnic groups around the national parks of England and Wales. The table gives the populations of 13 National Parks. Three of the national parks are found in Wales and ten are in England. There are 5 ethnic categories; white, mixed, Asian, black and other. These are divided into 18 sub-categories. The first column shows the total number of people usually resident in that national park. The park with the highest overall population was South Downs National Park with 112,343 people. The lowest overall population was Northumberland National Park with 1,993 people. Both of these parks are in England. The three Welsh parks had a total mean average population of 27,230. Over 90% of the population in all the national parks is White British. The second largest number of people is found in the White: Other category, although the table does not specify where these people originate from. Northumberland has the least ethnically diverse population with 8 of the sub-categories containing no people at all. South Downs was the most ethnically diverse with all of its sub-categories containing over 30 people, in most cases, many more than that. Four of the parks; Brecon Beacons, Peak District, New Forest and Dartmoor had similar total numbers of residents, between 33,000 and 38,000 people. These four parks show very similar percentage results in all categories except one, Asian. The Asian population in the Brecon Beacons was 2%, in the other three parks it was much less than 1%. The sub-category that increased the numbers in the Asian population in Brecon was that of British; Other Asian. In Brecon there were 540 in this group, in the other parks there were less than 100 people in each. In Snowdonia and South Downs parks, 0.1% of the population were found in the Other ethnic group; Arab. This was a higher percentage than found in any of the other parks. The three least populated parks; Broads, Exmoor and Northumberland had the smallest percentages of Asian/Asian British: Chinese with all of them well under 0.1%. The sub-category that contained the fewest amount of people across all of the parks was Black/African/Caribbean/Black British: Other Black. In conclusion the table shows that across the national parks of England and Wales, the overwhelming majority of the population is White. There are interesting anomalies in some parks where the percentage of an ethnic group is higher than other parks. In one park in particular this is particularly apparent in the Other Asian category. However the general picture is that of little ethnic diversity in the national parks of England and Wales. Word count; 476.

References:
Table 1 page 23 Assignment Booklet 2014B DD101 Introducing the Social Sciences. The Open University.

TMA03 DD101 APRIL 2014
Question 2
Examine the argument that places can be a source of inclusion and exclusion for specific communities.

What is it about a place that makes people from specific communities feel included or excluded? Why should a place feel welcoming to some but shun others? Most people will generally identify with a place. It could be the place of their birth or where they live at a particular point in their lives. A situated identity can refer to someone’s connection to a place at one moment in their life i.e. they could be a visitor to that place or live there. A collective identity could apply to a specific community. For example a large collective identity could describe a nationality; “the Welsh” or it could refer to a smaller group of people such as “rough sleepers”. In the case of rough sleepers along a busy shopping street, other people, shoppers, visitors, workers and the like, would look upon rough sleepers...

References: Hinchcliffe. S. 2009 ‘Connecting people and places’ in Taylor. S, Hinchcliffe. S, Clarke. J, Bromley. S (eds) Making Social Lives. Milton Keynes. The Open University.
Taylor. S. 2009 ‘Who do we think we are? Identities in everyday life’ in Taylor. S, Hinchcliffe. S, Clarke. J, Bromley. S (eds) Making Social Lives. Milton Keynes. The Open University.
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