Tituba Salem Witch Trial

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The examinations for the first three accused women began with the examination of Sarah Good. During her examination, she did not confess to witchcraft and persistently claimed her innocence; the same went on during Sarah Osborne’s examination; but Tituba’s examination went almost in an opposite direction of the others. When Tituba’s examination began, it started off as usual with her being asked what evils she had committed and if she was responsible for hurting the children. She denied the accusations, but, after a while, she admitted that the Devil had come to her and bid her to serve him. When asked if she had seen anyone with the Devil when he came to her, she said yes. She said there were some women who had sometimes hurt the children, and among the women were Sarah Good and Sarah Osborne. Tituba went on to explain that the women and the Devil continued to urge her to serve him and hurt the children even though she refused the demands. She then said that the Devil had come to her with a book of people who served him and told her to sign it, and when asked if she saw any other names in the book, she said she saw nine but only remembering Sarah Good and Sarah Osborne. Since Tituba’s claim that there were more witches in Salem, the witch hunt officially began and hysteria beset the …show more content…
After the hysteria and the Trials ended, food became more scarce, taxes went up and life was all-around significantly harder than before. As time passed, the people of Salem Village began to feel guilt and regret for what had happened during the Trials. The residents believed that they were being punished by God. This idea was reinforced due to the recent influx of near-by Indian attacks, droughts, crop failures and smallpox

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