Preview

Through Deaf Eyes Documentary Summary

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
1359 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Through Deaf Eyes Documentary Summary
| Through Deaf Eyes | By Joshua Curtis |

Instructor: Anisa Guy Class: ASL103-05
5/31/2011
|

Through Deaf Eyes let me really see how the Deaf culture sees the world. The video let me appreciate the deaf culture more and understand it better. Deaf people suffered many hardships through the years but opportunities for them are growing more and more. The way hearing view Deaf culture is becoming more and more accepting. Parents of deaf children have to face many tough decisions on how to help their child succeed in life.
When I look at a deaf person or hard of hearing person, I look at them a lot different now than I did growing up. Through my grade school years our school had special classes for students with handicaps and disabilities. We had one student named Josh (He was hard of hearing), who went to our school for a couple of years. He would go to his special class in the morning and then join the regular class later in the day. Josh was one of the first hard of hearing persons I have ever met. He seemed normal but I associated him as having a handicap or disability because he went to the “special class”. So from there I always associated deaf people as having a handicap. Josh would occasionally get special treatment because
…show more content…
Having a deaf child from hearing parents can be very shocking and overwhelming to the parents. Some parents are taking very risky steps to deal with the deafness and that is having cochlear implants giving to their child at very young ages. The problem I have with the situation is that it is very risky for the child and the child does not have a say in the matter. The operation could cause damaging effects for life to the child and it is irreversible. Parents think deafness is the end of the world for their child and they think if that by getting the implants it will solve all the problem, which we learned it will

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Through Deaf Eyes

    • 543 Words
    • 3 Pages

    While watching Through Deaf Eyes, there were a lot of things that I didn’t think about before. For example, when they started talking about how even in deaf schools, African Americans were segregated from the rest of the white people I was a little thrown off by this. When talking about this in history classes, I never thought about segregating people twice?! The deaf community was already misunderstood and had to have their own schools and now the black deaf community had to be pushed out even farther? This concept started a whole new world for me. In my life, I really have never been exposed to sign language before. I think I have only met one real deaf person and he was about three and had a cochlear implant. So, the deaf community has never popped into my mind when it came to things like this.…

    • 543 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    through deaf eyes

    • 507 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The perspective I initially achieved during the film was that, deaf people had a really hard life. They strived to become equal with the “hearing world,” to not be out casted, to be allowed their own form of communication, and overall to be accepted for who they are. This film had so many great stories from the interviewers, they brought in that personal touch to make it effective and ensue many emotions. The whole film was very touching; I had a variation of feelings watching the film. I felt mad at times because what deaf people had to go through, sad for when the film mentioned what the children had to endure at schools, and happy when DPN happened and they showed the footage of it. Furthermore, I didn’t realize how much deaf people had to strive for throughout so many years, even today; I believe there is still some discrimination towards deaf people.…

    • 507 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    through deaf eyes

    • 311 Words
    • 1 Page

    Trough Deaf Eyes is a documentary outlining the history of the early deaf communities. The movie illustrates and touches the numerous achievements the deaf community has accomplished over the past years. It is startling to see and know the many obstacles that deaf citizens had to go through here in America to reach “acceptance”; this can almost be compared to years when African Americans were segregated. People these days might think that deaf citizens have it hard, but I’m pretty sure it is nothing compared to those years when it was punishable or looked down upon to use sign language to communicate with your family and friends. It is frustrating to know that deaf people were once forced to assimilate instead of just letting them sign. One of the movies speakers hints a good point when she shares that because she spent so much time learning how to assimilate words like “dog, cat, milk, and ext.” deaf people usually fell behind in their other topics. I can really relate to this and how frustrating it is because when I moved from Mexico to the U.S. I didn’t know any English at all. It was almost like being deaf because whenever I wanted to communicate to my teachers or fellow classmates most of my communication came from my hands since they all spoke mostly English and could not understand what I was saying or asking. Twice a week I was pulled out from my home classroom to go to another “special classroom” where another teacher would teach me English little by little along with another 5 other students. Thanks to that I also fell behind in my other school subjects in class; when it came down to grammar, reading, science, and cursive I sucked. Because of this small relation I found the movie to be really interesting.…

    • 311 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Through Deaf Eyes Summary

    • 622 Words
    • 3 Pages

    It was interesting to hear, and see, what kind of challenges that deaf people faced. One of the people I found interesting was. A hearing French professor had brought the language from France and that was how it signing had started. I thought that was interesting, because not only was it a long time to create a form of communication for the deaf community; they were also mistreated for their inability to communicate with the rest of the world. Another person that I found interesting, was Alexander Gram Bell, had a wife and mother, who were deaf. On top of that, it was startling at first, to hear that the deaf community treated him as a sort of “boogeyman.” I found it fascinating that he is well known in a hearing class for inventing the telephone, but in the deaf class, he is known for starting the Oralism form of communication in the deaf community. Along with that, Bell fought against having sign language being taught, because he felt that it was a “borrowed language.” Instead he wanted the people community to learn to speak and read lips. It was interesting to hear, because I assumed that most people who were deaf just learned sign language for their communication.…

    • 622 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The film Through Deaf Eyes demonstrated a great understanding of the death community. I found this short film extremely educational as well as informative of the Deaf culture and its people. This film opened my eyes and broaden my education in the Deaf culture. Growing up I never came into the situation of interacting with someone who was Deaf, before my ASL class I had absolutely no idea that there was such a rich and interesting history in the Deaf community. I found this movie to be extremely moving, and assist me in my career as a student as well as a young professional in the work force.…

    • 484 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Deaf Culture Book Report

    • 1072 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Thomas K. Holcomb’s book, Introduction to American Deaf Culture, shines a light on the deaf community and the culture they experience. The intended audience, however, is the hearing. It gives the reader insight on deaf experiences and how the atmosphere is different, even though the environment is the same. All aspects of culture are covered. The book starts off with how the culture is formed through the 5 hallmarks (p. 17). Next, the book focuses on the identity of a deaf person. This is not only limited to, labeling from the rest of the world, but also by how the person sees himself. After, the book discusses the core values the deaf community has. These values are much different when compared to the hearing community. They focus on the person engaging as a full member of society. This is done through communication, interacting, and having a sense of self-worth in the community (104-107). Eventually, literature and art are mentioned. The classifications are difficult to place. There are American works, but with the growing awareness in the recent year they have earned their own Deaf category. This is important to the deaf community because it allows “Deaf people’s lives to be better…

    • 1072 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Deaf Culture in America

    • 972 Words
    • 4 Pages

    When I finished reading the book I realized that I had just learned way more than I had been expecting. Just reading the first chapter was enough for me to be awestruck by the intricacies of the Deaf culture, but as I continued reading I realized that the depth and many levels of social structure are so detailed that being able to fully understand them would be simply impossible. I was very impressed with the amount of respect that the word Deaf conveys among the Deaf community. The first chapter to me seemed to be the most interesting. The many stories about Deaf children meeting friends and interacting shed a new light on the way that Deaf people learn to communicate. The word Deaf itself is used to communicate specific things. It not only describes a culture but it can be used to describe a single person or family at the same time. It seemed that the word itself was extremely multifaceted in its usage.…

    • 972 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    First, this book allowed me to see the negative way in which deaf people were perceived. This book is not old by any means, and I was taken aback by the way deaf children were perceived by not only others in the community, but often times by their own parents as well. The term “Deaf and Dumb” is one that I had never heard before, yet one that was used far too often. It is appalling to think that this was used for all deaf people, by not only a few of the more ignorant people who did not understand, but by doctors, teachers, and even the parents of deaf children. This term is offensive and just plain wrong. It is very apparent to me that deaf people are well educated and that their inability to hear has no affect on their ability to learn. Before reading this book I would have never guessed that so many people thought differently not so long ago.…

    • 923 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Similarly, the Deaf child, however raised, has a Deaf heritage form birth. Most children who cannot communicate well in spoken language will, when allowed to, learn signed language, become acculturated to Deaf culture, marry Deaf, and identify themselves as members of the Deaf World. A distinguished otologist has contended that Deaf children start out in mainstream hearing society and enter the Deaf World in adolescence. Most children in the Deaf World cannot communicate with their parents who know no sign language, and while their home may be nurturing, it cannot be substantially acculturating. The anormality of having culturally different parents is then both a centrifugal and centripetal force in the Deaf World. At the same time, the anomaly propels Deaf people toward the Deaf World, since identification with the Deaf World offers pride, language, instruction, role models, a culturally compatible spouse, and more than cannot be had…

    • 675 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cohecular Implants

    • 341 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Many members of the deaf community are content with their unique culture and do not regard deafness as a disorder or something that needs to be cured. Within the deaf community, particular scorn is reserved for the practice of placing cochlear implants in young children. The National Association of the Deaf, maintains that there is no evidence that deaf children who receive implants early are better able to acquire English or have greater educational success than other deaf children.…

    • 341 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    While viewing "In the Land of the Deaf" it help me seeing how hard of hearing kids figure out how to hear by utilizing Hearing aids. Its overview differentiating the stories of a family who has been hard of hearing and with the narrative of a lady whose deafness was misconstrued. The film shows Deaf individuals of all ages, children to grown-ups. With their similar deafness, the kids and grown-ups in this film communicate their dreams, thoughts and ideas through sign language which is used for them to communicate. While watching “See What I mean: Differences Between Deaf and Hearing Cultures” it help me comprehend and accomplish a more better understanding of culturally diverse point of view and valuation for Deaf and listening to societies…

    • 141 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Through Deaf Eyes

    • 935 Words
    • 4 Pages

    THROUGH DEAF EYES is a two-hour documentary that explores 200 years of Deaf life in America. The film presents the shared experiences of American history - family life, education, work, and community connections from the perspective of deaf citizens…

    • 935 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Essay On Deaf Culture

    • 1281 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Everyone in this world has their own opinion of things. In deaf culture, people frequently talk about the two main perspectives of deafness. “Pathological" perspective that versus the "cultural" perspective of deafness. Both hearing and deaf people can accept whichever perspective. These two main perspectives of deafness are pretty different. The Pathological view can also be called the medical view. Because doctors usually have a pathological view of deafness and look at it as an impairment, disability, something to be treated so that deaf patients can be able to hear. Medical specialists suggest treatment, such as implants or speech therapy, so that deaf people can get along in a hearing world easily. The point of these is to make the deaf person seem as "normal" as possible, with the view that if you are hearing then you are “normal”, but if you are deaf then you are not “normal”. Some people who contribute…

    • 1281 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Hyde, Marv, Renee Punch, and et al. "Coming to a Decision About Cochlear Implantation: Parents Making Choices for their Deaf Children." Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education. Oxford University Press, 2010. Web. 27 Apr 2012. http://intl-jdsde.oxfordjournals.org/content/15/2/162.full…

    • 2191 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Deaf Culture

    • 2451 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Every human being is born to develop their five senses; sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch. Not all humans develop these five senses in their life. One of the senses that commonly does not develop or is at loss when growing up is hearing. Those people that are hard of hearing or have a loss of hearing are classified as deaf. There are many deaf people in the world, it can range from 5 million to 40 million people. The population of people who are deaf is so large, they even have their own Deaf culture or community. The Deaf culture is best defined as a social group of people who consider deafness to be a difference in human experience. Most people believe it’s a disability, but it’s not. It is assumed that if you are deaf you are automatically included into the Deaf community, or if you are hearing you are automatically excluded from this group. Both of these statements are extremely false. “It is not the extent of hearing loss that defines a member of the Deaf Community but the individual's own sense of identity and resultant actions” ( Mindess, 2006, p.83). There is so much to learn about the Deaf culture; from the diversity in the group, to the meaning of the word “deaf”, their behaviors within the community, and of course recognizing the accomplishments they have made in their community. Methodology…

    • 2451 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays