things fall apart

Topics: Things Fall Apart, Chinua Achebe, Igbo people Pages: 4 (1295 words) Published: October 28, 2014
Chinua Achebe’s novel Things Fall Apart sold more than twelve million copies and has been translated into more than fifty different languages. Born in Nigeria in 1930, Achebe plays a central role in the history of postcolonial African literature. This novel centers on a cultural clash between native African culture and the traditional white culture of missionaries (Achebe 60). Richard Begam is the author of “Achebe’s Sense of Ending: History and Tragedy in Things Fall Apart” and discusses the importance of how Okonkwo’s suicide leaves the reader with the belief that Okonkwo dies an honorable tribe member despite the crimes he committed. Dr. Mohamed Fawzy El-Dessouky, the author of “The Cultural Impact upon Human Struggle for Social Existence in novel Things Fall Apart” is describing how tradition in the Ibo tribe should not be forgotten using Okonkwo. This is the main argument throughout the novel and should not be overlooked. Eric Sipyinyu Njeng in “Achebe's Work, Postcoloniality, and Human Rights” expresses how Achebe’s use of gender roles is significant to the Ibo’s culture and to say it’s not who you are, but how you act. All three of these authors stress the importance of the Ibo’s culture traditions and gender roles in Achebe’s novel Things Fall Apart. Richard Begam the author of “Achebe’s Sense of Ending: History and Tragedy in Things Fall Apart” argues that Okonkwo’s suicide leaves the reader to believe that Okonkwo dies an honorable death despite his wrong doings in the Ibo tribe. Begam says, “The larger effect of Achebe’s opening is to establish Okonkwo as a particular kind of tragic protagonist: the great warrior who carries with him the fate of his people” (399). I agree with Begam because throughout the novel Achebe stresses how noble and brave Okonkwo is. Okonkwo did commit crimes but the crimes were only committed to uphold his tradition. Begam notes that: Like Achelles, Okonkwo is “a man of action, a man of war” (p.7). His “fame” among the Igbo...

Cited: Author Profile: Chinua Achebe
Chinua Achebe
World Literature Today , Vol. 79, No. 1 (Jan. - Apr., 2005), p. 60
Begam, Richard. Achebe’s Sense of An Ending: History and Tragedy in “Things Fall Apart.” "Studies in the Novel , Vol. 29, No. 3, POSTCOLONIALISM, HISTORY, AND THE NOVEL (fall 1997), pp. 396-411
El-Dessouky, Mohamed Fawzy. "The Cultural Impact Upon Human Struggle For Social Existence In Chinua Achebe 's "Things Fall Apart." English Language Teaching 3.3 (2010): 98-106. Education Research Complete. Web. 25 Sept. 2013.
Njeng, Eric Sipyinyu. "Achebe 's work, postcoloniality, and human rights." CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture 15.1 (2013). Academic OneFile. Web. 25 Sept. 2013.
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