Therapeutic Patents: A Case Study

Good Essays
Measuring an innovation or an individual, group or company’s innovativeness has always been challenging. Although patents do not reflect completely innovations, because of its strong relation with R&D activities and its quantifiable data, patents has been often chosen as the measurement for R&D innovative activities.
Patents do not equal to innovations and not all patents have the same value. There are only a small number of patents that are highly valuable. Approximately 10% of the most valuable patents account for more than 80% of the value of all the German patents (Scherer & Harhoff, 2000). More than 60% of patents are neither used internally nor licensed out (Japan Patent Office). Firms often use patents not only for product development purposes but also as business tactics; for example, blocking other firms’ patents or to create barrier of entry. In some other cases, firms intentionally choose not to patent their inventions since that will require the disclosure of information, therefore, other means such as trade secret were used.
However, patents could still be evidences of innovations because they represent a large part of R&D effort by firms. R&D and patenting strongly affect one another where a company’s decision to patent an innovation could reflect that firm’s R&D effort (Arora, Ceccagnoli, & Cohen, 2008). Patents also
…show more content…
Since “technological progress is cumulative so that inventors stand on the shoulders of others for further progress”, “a large number of forward citations mean that the patent serves as a giant shoulder for many other subsequent innovations” (Nagaoka, Motohashi, & Goto, 2010). Since inventor of subsequent innovations usually try to save the cost of R&D both in term of finance and effort in order to not reinvent the wheel, a high number of forward citations can represent that patent has wide applications and has high social value (Nagaoka, Motohashi, & Goto,

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    patents cases

    • 3658 Words
    • 15 Pages

    Patents Wheatley v Drillsafe Ltd. (2001) Wheatley v Drillsafe Ltd. Facts: Wheatley (W), the proprietor and licensee of a European patent relating to a threaded hole cutting device, appealed against a decision holding that the patent was invalid on the ground of common general knowledge and accordingly should be revoked, and also that, in any event, there had been no infringement of the patent by Drillsafe (D) and others. Contentions: D maintained, inter alia, that its use of a semi-penetrating…

    • 3658 Words
    • 15 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Patent Trolls Case Study

    • 5700 Words
    • 23 Pages

    A Study in Business Law of Patent Trolls March 12, 2014 “‘Oh, the story of a troll kind of fits ‘cause the whole Billy Goats Gruff thing, it’s someone lying under a bridge they didn’t build, demanding payment from anyone who passed. I said, ‘How about a patent troll?’” Peter Detkin Counsel for Intel It’s a story every child knows: The poor three Billy Goats Gruff that just want to cross the bridge. The evil troll that blocks their way and demands a stiff toll before letting…

    • 5700 Words
    • 23 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Introduction A therapeutic relationship is a sharp bond between nurse and patient, which grows among them at grounded on patients' essentials aimed at care, support, and direction (Arnold and Boggs 2007). The therapeutic relationship is built on conviction, admiration, sympathy and professional communication, and also involves appropriate custom of features in the nurse actions (Arnold and Boggs 2007). Arnold and Boggs (2007) state the health worker-patients connection is proficient and therapeutic and it…

    • 2150 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Storti English 12 On average, 70% of released prison inmates reenter the prison system after 5 years (Zhang et al., 2010). This relatively high statistics makes us ask the question, is the Department of Corrections really making any corrections? Therapeutic Communities, implemented in the prison setting, have provided an alternative to traditional convict treatment. They have shown mixed results of effectiveness, and are costly to the state and nation. Are they truly worth the money? Providing help…

    • 764 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    of the living arrangement. In the beginning of the interview I was unaware of the resident’s diagnosis. So, I began the interview with a therapeutic communication and tried to figure which assessment I will conduct with the client. Resident had advanced stage of Parkinson’s disease and excessive, uncontrollable body movement. Patient also had a severe case of rheumatoid arthritis. Resident also mentioned about having diarrhea for the past 3-4 days and he was following BRAT diet. I assessed the…

    • 717 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Therapeutic Cloning: Do the benefits outweigh the risks? Therapeutic cloning is an evolutionary technology with the potential to significantly improve life quality and open doorways for technologies previously considered unattainable. This technology could be used to create organs for transplants constructed from the patient’s own genetic material, provide potential cures for some genetic diseases, all from an easily accessible source. However, there are numerous risks and costs involved with this…

    • 1068 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    outcome. Factors like therapeutic alliance, therapy modality, environmental factors, intervention techniques, client experience in therapy, and therapist competency could influence the outcome of a therapy positively or negatively. Out of these factors, therapeutic alliance brings about 80% of the most change in therapy session. One of the common factors in therapy treatment outcome I will be writing on is the therapeutic alliance between the client and the therapist. Therapeutic alliance is the working…

    • 497 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    against many rare diseases comes out of the pharmaceutical company named Amicus Therapeutics. Based in Cranbury, New Jersey, with a second research facility in Southern California, the company is making gains in the pharmaceutical industry on the heel of announcements that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is planning to accept a New Drug Application (NDA) for the new drug Migalastat which was developed by Amicus Therapeutics. An oral precision medicine, Migalasta will be the latest in an arsenal…

    • 346 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    1. Use of effective and therapeutic communication methods with patients and members of the interprofessional health care team to deliver high quality patient care. SLO (D) (N4518 Syllabus p.1): I use therapeutic communication by making myself available to my patient and showing interest in their concern such as asking about their pain every hour or asking if they need water/ snacks when necessary. I also ask about similarities and difference in event such as “Is the numbness you’re having today worse…

    • 1740 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Therapeutic Intervention 1. In your opinion, what are the appropriate short-term goals for this intervention? The appropriate short-term goals for this intervention are designed for the client to help reduce fear. The client should join a support group with other individuals that suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The support group should be conducted by a licensed professional. The Client should be able to identify when the fear is taking over his life. The client should also…

    • 290 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays