Theories of Crime

Topics: Crime, Criminology, Gang / Pages: 4 (901 words) / Published: Jun 1st, 2011
Theories of Crime: Comparisons and Contrasts
Cheryl Diana Drake
Everest University Phoenix

The causes of crime are still really not known. There are many different theories and perspectives on why crime exists. However, even with all of the studies and perspectives on crimes committed, it appears to me that the causes of crime are only speculative.
Biological Theory
The biological theories primarily study the physical constitution and endocrinology. They are a very good example of the theories that have not really received any practical support. The misunderstanding of these theories has caused a stereotype that if a person is a criminal then he or she was born as a criminal and any steps taken in order to change or to influence them are useless. Biological theories are only a part of and one of the interpretations of criminality but not the only ones. In the present time, there is no assertive evidence of the fact, that the physical constitution and other biological factors cause criminality. Nevertheless, these theories have a right to exist and there has been a lot of important information that is used in terms of the development of criminology as a science. The most vivid example of the biological determinism is the theory of Cesare Lombroso. Lombroso based his theory on the assumption that criminals have certain physiognomic features or abnormalities. The origin of scientific criminology is usually traced to the research of Cesare Lombroso (1836-1909).
Behavioral Crimes
While some may not agree with me, I believe some people just commit crimes. A lot of these people were brought up in violent homes, had parents who were not good examples such as, taking harsh drugs, abusing their children, leaving their children alone for long periods of time and so on. True fact: I grew up with a very abusive father, who ended up killing our mother. I was one of nine children, all of whom were beaten grotesquely everyday and for no known cause.



References: Drake, Cheri, 1959-Present Lambroso, Cesar (1836-1909) United States District Court, Montgomery County Maryland, State vs. Bawdin (1992) Vold, G. B. & Bernard, T. J. “Theoretical Criminology”/ Oxford/1986

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