Theoretical Positions

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Theoretical positions come from within the field of development psychology are being debated. The greatest insight of psychological analysis consists of Alder’s individual psychology, Jung’s analytical psychology, James’s stream of thought and Freud’s psychoanalysis, provides a clear explanation on consciousness. On the other hand, understanding the importance of consciousness and the traditional psychoanalytical approach where psychologist emphasizes on the contrast between functionalism and structuralism. Alfred Adler became a psychiatrist in 1907 after practicing both optometry and general medicine because of his love for the human mind. Cynthia Osborn wrote that,” Alfred Adler was a visionary. He envisioned human nature in concepts and images never before expressed by either his contemporaries or his predecessors” (Osborn, 2001). Adler’s approach to psychology was initially close to Sigmund Freud’s views considering he was a member of Freud’s discussion group, but quickly changed after Adler made some contrary discoveries to Freud’s psychosexual theory. In 1911, Adler was made to resign as President of Freud’s Analytic Society because of disagreements he and Freud had concerning Freud’s psychosexual theories on development and …show more content…
During his time as a psychiatrist, Adler made some very profound discoveries in regards to personality. Adler believed that a person’s self image was created from their unconscious. The unconscious changes inferior feelings of self into feelings of superiority. Those feelings of completeness and superiority are challenged by society and various outside influences and the person is then made to feel inferior. Then they overcompensate for those negative feelings and thus an inferiority complex is formed. These negative feelings of inferiority lead to the person acting out in aggressive and neurotic

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