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Theorethical Perspectives

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Theorethical Perspectives
Carl Rogers person centred approach to counselling

This essay will evaluate the necessity and importance of the development of the core conditions in the humanistic counselling process and critically analyse the strengths and weaknesses of the person-centred approach in the counselling process. “The Person-Centred Approach focuses on the clients own best authority as it is based on the client’s personal experience in his or her own life here and now. It shows the client as someone who has the ability of fulfilling his or her own potential for changes” (Mearns & Thorne, 2007)
I believe that Carl Rogers Person-Centred counselling is reliable. It developed the method of enhancing the relationship formed between a counsellor or therapist and client. Rogers proposes that the development of trust and understanding within this relationship encourages self-realization, and enables the client to acknowledge the problems and issues they are facing.” This approach of encouragement and guidance, helps the client to feel comfortable about disclosing personal and private information to the counsellor, which in turn helps the client on their journey for their solutions” (Mearns & Thorne 2007).
Rogers identified certain core conditions which he believed to be necessary if clients are to make progress in counselling. It defines the counsellors qualities and attitudes which if present, will easily change the growth within the client. The most important of these attitudes is the counsellor’s ability to understand the client’s feelings and at the same time show respect for the client and being congruent or genuine. Rogerian therapys main core conditions are Empathy, Unconditional Positive Regard and Congruence or genuineness, but he also listed six more conditions in addition to these three.
1. Two persons are in Psychological contact.
2. The first, whom we shall term the client, is in a state of incongruence, being vulnerable or anxious.



References: Dave Mearns and Brain Thorne. Person - Centred Counselling in Action. (Sage Publication Ltd 3rd Edition 2007) Tony Merry. Invitation to Person Centred Psychology. (Whurr Publisher Ltd) Dave Mearns, & Brain Thorne. Person - Centred Counselling in Action (Sage Publication Ltd, 2nd Edition 1999) Carl Rogers. Client Cantered Therapy (Constable London 2002) Rogers C – The Rogers reader (Constable) Biography of CARL ROGERS 1902 - 1987 by Dr. C. George Boeree http://webspace.ship.edu/cgboer/rogers.htm

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