Theme Of Nature In Candide

Topics: Morality, Political philosophy, Human, Religion, State of nature, Ethics / Pages: 2 (256 words) / Published: Nov 24th, 2015
The condition of nature reflects the condition of man. Focus particularly on the contrasts between the ravages of the battle, the earthquake, and the general surroundings, and the Utopian state of El Dorado, and later the farm at the conclusion. Also, tie the role of one of the main themes of the book (the failure of Leibnizian optimism) with what Candide perceives.

There is a difference between when Pangloss interprets the world as a philosopher at the beginning, and the roots of starting to disbelieve - particularly look for a passage which "What have you have said, Master Pangloss, had you found such barbarities in nature? Would you not acknowledge that nature is corrupted, that all is not (for the best) -" in Chapter 9.

In Candide men

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