Theme Of Isolation In Jane Eyre

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There are two types of isolation, mental isolation and physical isolation. Physical isolation is when someone is separated from a group of people, while mental isolation is when someone feels alone even if they have people around them. Physical isolation can lead to mental isolation (Isolation). The theme of physical and mental isolation is shown throughout "Jane Eyre". This pattern of isolation had a negative effect on Jane Eyre that started at a young age and continued along with her until she experienced community and love in her marriage at Ferndean.
Jane loses her parents at a young age, she was first brought to the Reed's house by her uncle. But when her uncle passed away, her aunt promised to take Jane as one of her own children.
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Jane expresses her desire to be with Rochester when she says, "I'll not leave you on my own accord" (Bronte 546). This is the first time in the novel that Jane expresses content with who she is with where she is living. Jane describes her marriage by saying, "I am my husband's life as fully as he is mine. No woman was ever nearer to her mate than I am" (Bronte 554). It is evident that Jane feels a close connection with Rochester, and this is one of the first times in her life that she does not feel isolated from everyone she is with.
The theme of physical and mental isolation is shown all throughout Jane Eyre. This pattern of isolation had a negative effect on Jane that started at a young age and continued along with her until she experienced community and love in her marriage at Ferndean. Jane experiences isolation from her cousins at the Reed House when she is younger. This isolation then follows her as she attends Lowood School and when she becomes a governess at Thornfield. Her isolation left her with self-confidence issues and no friends. She does not feel a personal connection to anyone until she is happily married at

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