The Women's Rights Movement

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Women were constantly faced with challenges throughout history. Women and men were not considered equal in the eye of the public. As time progressed women began to take notice to these differences related to gender in society. In 1848, a group of women and men came together to fight for reform. The first gathering formed for the purpose of discussing and fighting for women’s rights occurred in Seneca Falls, New York on July 19th, 1848. The leaders of the first movement consisted of two women: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott. The two women met at the World’s Antislavery Convention in London in year 1840. Lucretia Mott was a female abolitionist who studied the traditions of women’s rights. Similarly, Stanton was an abolitionist activist …show more content…
Some of these problems lied with the leaders of the movement itself. Often times, there was a difference of opinion in terms of the different strategies used to fuel the movement. These disagreements could have easily destroyed the women’s rights movement in its entirety, but the women held their ground to work towards their goal of equality. However, while some of the issues faced within the movement were caused within the group of activists, most of their issues came from other sources. Some of these sources include the fact that some women, in fact, did not want the reform to occur. It was believed that if the social norms were challenged, it would change the role of women in society. If women were granted this level of suffrage, in a sense, it would create competition among both men and women in reference to education, work, and overall social standings. Another obstacle the women’s right movement faced consisted of fear. This fear was in fact, introduced by other women afraid of reform and role changes. Women feared that gaining suffrage would affect their overall feminine characteristics. It was argued that once women’s presence surfaced in the realm of politics, women would ultimately be viewed differently. Women did not want their submissive nature and natural roles as wives and mothers to their children to no longer hold precedence as a result of their new-found

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