The Wars Of Religion Dbq Essay

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1. I think the French Wars of Religion was more about religious differences because ever since the French nobles became Calvinists, they would show independence from the central power. It created the conflict between Catholics and Calvinists where power was the main struggle making religion become a way bigger issue. The last of the wars would be the war of the Three Henry’s where it showed the overall religious differences between the Catholics and the Protestants. Which this was between Henry III and Henry of Guise versus Henry IV.
2. The idea to bring monarchs in restoring Catholic unity in Western Europe was when taking some of the wealth of the Americas, which Christopher Columbus accidentally found the Americas, and bring it to the Spanish port of Seville and Lisbon, however the Flemish city of Antwerp was controlled by the
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On October 31, 1517, Luther attached to the door of the church at Wittenberg castle the 95 theses against the indulgences. Since they were read, it spread throughout the Holy Roman Empire. This is the beginning point of the declination of the Holy Roman Empire. Soon he would late challenge the Pope and the church. After doing that he was then excommunicated. Later Charles V declared that Luther is the outlaw of the empire and believes he shouldn’t get protection even though he gets protection from the princes. Since Luther’s beliefs were spreading, the poor would start to do crazy stuff when starting to steal from people. Later the decline involved in the Peasants to revolt against the church by using Luther’s writings. Lutheranism was what the poor

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