Preview

The US Constitution: The Fourteenth And Fifteenth Amendments

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
554 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
The US Constitution: The Fourteenth And Fifteenth Amendments
During a period of Reconstruction, there were two exceptionally significant implications to the U.S. Constitution: the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments. The Fourteenth Amendment, ratified in July of 1868, consisted of five sections, which ultimately stated that ALL “persons born or naturalized in the U.S., and subject to jurisdiction thereof are citizens”. Additionally, it reduced state representation in Congress proportionally for any state disfranchising male citizens, denied former Confederates the right to hold office, and lastly repudiated (meaning disclaimed/disowned) Confederate debt. Moving right along, the Fifteenth Amendment, ratified in March of 1870 and consisting of only two sections, guaranteed the right of suffrage to ALL

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    | Self-government is a democracy and simply means that the government is for the people and by the people. As citizens we have the right to vote for our leaders and with our leaders on important issues within our community and country.…

    • 1333 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The 14th Amendment

    • 1800 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The Fourteenth Amendment was a direct outgrowth of the national debate over slavery1, and the subsequent emancipation of the slaves during the Civil War. In the aftermath of that war, Congress confronted a number of thorny issues: what would be done about the rebel leaders? Would the defeated states contribute to paying off the Union’s debts? Would slave owners be compensated for the loss of their property? What measures would be required of the defeated states as a condition of their full re-admittance to the Union? Two cases that took place before the creation of the Fourteenth Amendment are particularly important, considering that in a way or another they would help shape this Amendment: Barron vs. Baltimore and Dred Scott vs. Sanford.…

    • 1800 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Ten Amendments

    • 998 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Constitution contains the ten amendments all of which I will explain in this essay. I will also explain some key facts of which the Constitution is written by and some of the dates in which key points of the Constitution occurred. The Constitution is a very important document which was created more than two hundred years ago. The first amendment is the amendment of is the freedom of religion, speech, assembly, and press. Congress can make no law establishing a religion and it gives the freedom of speech. It also grants the right to hold an assembly. The second amendment allows citizens the right to bear arms. The third amendment grants the right that no soldier can take refuge in someone…

    • 998 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    United States Constitution

    • 1415 Words
    • 6 Pages

    1.) Colonial North Carolina has often been described as having been a tumultuous, unstable place. Write an essay that defends and explains this description. In your essay be sure to cover specific issues and events, but also discuss the sectional divisions that existed in the North Carolina colony that were revealed by these issues and events.…

    • 1415 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    What impacts did the Fifteenth Amendment have on the South during the Reconstruction Era of…

    • 1488 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The First Ten Amendments

    • 2677 Words
    • 11 Pages

    My father was a minister, and was thus afforded the right to practice and teach his children what he believed, without government interference. The Freedom of Speech goes right along with the Freedom of Religion, because I am allowed to voice my opinions and beliefs without repercussion. There are many issues with the First Amendment when it comes to Freedom of Religion, with one of the major issues being the Separation of Church and State. Is our right to Freedom of Religion being taken away from us by not allowing the use of prayer in schools? If you want to say a prayer in school with other believers, is this in violation of the amendment? How is it that if for religious reasons, you choose not to immunize your children, you can then have the State Department called to your home for child neglect? Does this Amendment not give us the right to make choices for ourselves and our families? I chose this picture to represent my feelings on religion. I believe it should be my right to teach, express and voice my beliefs, without the interference of the State.…

    • 2677 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The thirteenth amendment formally abolished the institution of slavery, and gave congress the power to enforce it. The thirteenth amendment was necessary because even though the Emancipation Proclamation declared slaves in the south to be freed, the southern states refused to free them, and the amendment encompassed the entire U.S. and it’s territories. Overall, I feel the amendment was a success, because it gave the government the ability to enforce it as a law. There were many ways that southerners found to work around this new law, such as black work camps, but overall I think that the amendment was a success.…

    • 306 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Reconstruction Dbq

    • 2151 Words
    • 9 Pages

    The 14th Amendment which was suppose to give blacks full citizenship left room for the Southern government to deny blacks their right to vote. Thus the 15th Amendment had to be proposed and passed giving all male citizens the right to vote, but even so many whites still withheld the ballot from blacks with “various underhanded schemes [such as] literacy tests, unfairly administered by whites to the advantages of illiterate whites” (p. 496). Moreover, though the Supreme Court was left untouched during Reconstruction, when southern delegates were sent to take their seats in congress “on the first day of the congressional session, December 4, 1865, they banged shut Republicans banged shut the door in the face of the newly elected Southern delegations” (p. 488) in fear of losing their advantage in congress. Thus, the democratic ideal of every fraction of American society being represented was broken as the south had no say in congress. Furthermore, in the Northern Republican’s attempt to expand the federal government to help the freedmen more effectively, “Republicans imposed national control on the Southern states, completely ignoring the constitutional concept of federalism in…

    • 2151 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    As the bill later became the fourteenth amendment, it grants citizenship and protections from laws for all persons born in the United States, including former slaves who just got freed. (5) The fourteenth amendment has played a big role in the reconstruction as it protected African Americans’ rights in life and moved the society forward. The last amendment passed in the Reconstruction was the fifteenth amendment, permitting all citizens the right to vote despite of their race. (6) Nevertheless, it did not offer such right to…

    • 477 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Post War Dbq

    • 73 Words
    • 1 Page

    Before the Union had won in 1865, we were faced with many challenges after the war ended. One of the main challenges post-war was the mixture of 4 million newly released African Americans in the nation and some federal representation from former states in the rebellion. Since then the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments were added to the Constitution which explained civil rights and legal protection to any former slaves during this…

    • 73 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Civil War Dbq Analysis

    • 770 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Where originally the goal was to reform the United States of America and answer the question of slavery in the states (popular sovereignty or not), was changed to the abolitions of slavery and appeasing and angry south. According to the Republican Party Platform of 1864, the addition of the 14th and 15th amendments granted the right of suffrage and citizenship demanded by the convention of coloreds only further aggravated the war torn south (Doc H). As a result the government was forced to focus the majority of Johnson’s presidency on the reconstruction on the US. Blacks were supporters of the reconstruction, as shown by their extremely instrumental involvement in the constitutional conventions (Doc J). Blacks were able to gain full citizenship and suffrage, feats that would have been otherwise impossible if they had not affected the course of the civil war in t hey way that they…

    • 770 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Bill of Rights is the collective name for the first ten amendments to the U.S constitution. The purpose of The Bill of Rights is to protect individual liberties. This document was created September 25, 1789 and was then ratified on December 15, 1791. This took two years after being created to be put in the government's records. This document added certain safeguards of democracy. This provided personal freedoms as well as personal rights. The author of The Bill of Rights is James Madison.…

    • 1436 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    4th, 5th, and 6th amendment

    • 3560 Words
    • 15 Pages

    The Fourth Amendment protects the right of the people to be secure in their persons,…

    • 3560 Words
    • 15 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The incorporation of the Bill of Rights is the procedure by which the United States courts have implemented pieces of the United States Bill of Rights to the states, by the due process clause of the 14th Amendment of the Constitution. During the case of Barron v. Baltimore, the U.S. Supreme Court expressed that the Bill of Rights implemented to the government, but not to the states. Some claimed that the creator of the 14th Amendment intention had been to reverse this particular precedent. This Amendment is one of the reconstruction Amendment, and was adopted in 1868. The fourteenth Amendment Due Process Clause forbids local and state governments from denying persons of liberty, life, or property without particular steps that guaranteed fairness.…

    • 756 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Bill of Rights is the collective name for the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution. They were proposed to assure the fears of Anti-Federalist who had opposed Constitutional ratification. The Bill of Rights guaranteed a number of personal freedoms, limit the government’s power in judicial and other proceedings, and reserve some powers to the states and the public. Firstly, the Bill of Rights is successful in assuring the adoption of the Constitution. Secondly, the Bill of Rights did not address every foreseeable situation. Thirdly, the Bill of Rights has assured the safety of the people of the United States of America. Successes, failures, and consequences are what made the Bill of Rights what…

    • 1770 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays