The Treaty of Versailles

Topics: Treaty of Versailles, World War I, World War II Pages: 3 (751 words) Published: October 4, 2013
The Treaty of Versailles is a peace treaty that was put into place at the end of world war one to ensure that there would be peace between the countries involved. This treaty mainly involved Germany, France, Britain and the United States (though Germany was banned from the negotiations). Although the Treaty was intended to create peace between these countries, it wasn't entirely fair on Germany and was, in fact, rather punitive.

Firstly, Germany was banned from the negotiations. This made the Treaty unfair from the beginning, as it meant the 'Big Three' (France, Britain and the United States) could negotiate the conditions of the Treaty to increase their personal benefit (as a nation). French Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau was mainly concerned with protecting France from future German invasion. While negotiating the terms of the Treaty, Clemenceau told British Prime Minister David Lloyd George and US President Woodrow Wilson that "you are both sheltered; we are not." In this quote, he was referring to the risk of invasion he faced from Germany, as they shared a land border, whereas Britain and the US did not. Clemenceau's other main concern was the payment of reparations; France had suffered the heaviest loss of human life among the Allies, and insisted on reinforcing the payment of reparations. Lloyd George was also concerned with the preservation of the British Empire and the risk of future German invasion. He supported the enforcement of reparations to a lesser extent than the French, but he still succeeded in increasing the overall payment amount, and also the portion of that payment that Britain would receive as compensation for the huge number of men left unable to work because of the war. US President Woodrow Wilson was perhaps the fairest of the three on Germany; his main concern was rebuilding the European economy and he opposed harsh treatment of Germany. As the US wasn't largely involved in the war and wasn't a European power, Wilson had no...
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