The telephone call (by Dorothy Parker)

Topics: Short story, Fiction, The New Yorker, Telephone call, Telephone / Pages: 4 (1013 words) / Published: May 25th, 2014
The first thing we should mention analyzing this story is historical and cultural context. Speaking of historical context we should presuppose that it’s the very beginning of the 20th century, the USA.
I would like to say a few words about the author and the story I’m going to analyze further.

The text under analysis is the short story “The telephone call” belonging to the pen of Dorothy Parker, an American poet, short story writer, critic and satirist, best known for her wit, wisecracks, and eye for 20th-century urban foibles. The author is the master of psychological analysis. Her works are marked by a deep penetration into the soul of man. What can be valued most in the author’s works is her brilliant vivid style, refined treatment of characters, deep insight into human nature and powers of psychological analysis.
Parker rose to acclaim, both for her literary output in such venues as The New Yorker and as a founding member of the Algonquin Round Table. Following the breakup of the circle, Parker traveled to Hollywood to pursue screenwriting. Her successes there, including two Academy Award nominations, were curtailed as her involvement in left-wing politics led to a place on the Hollywood blacklist.
Dismissive of her own talents, she deplored her reputation as a "wisecracker". Nevertheless, her literary output and reputation for her sharp wit have endured.

In this story the author provided the best portrait of human nature, a woman’s heart. The author manages to boost the reader’s undivided attention from start to finish.
The story opens with the main character’s thoughts about her beloved who promised to call her, but never did. As the story unfolds and the action develops, the reader obtains further information about the characters. The story reaches its climax giving us the new “stage” of her thinking. Now the problem is stated, but there’s no resolution. It’s an open ending story.

Speaking of the title, we can claim that it’s rather plain and

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Dorothy Parker
  • Dorothy Parker
  • Dorothy Parker
  • Dorothy Parker
  • A Telephone Call
  • A Telephone Call
  • The Last Tea by Dorothy Parker
  • The Last Tea by Dorothy Parker
  • The Last Tea by Dorothy Parker
  • "The Standard of Living" - by Dorothy Parker.