The Stroop Effect
Topics: Working memory, Stroop effect, John Ridley Stroop, Psychology, Memory, Cerebrum / Pages: 11 (2555 words) / Published: Mar 10th, 2013

Tittle: The Stroop Effects theories and explanations

Jonathan James

Greenriver Community College

Tittle: The Stroop Effects theories and explanations

Research
The research conducted is to present an observation of the participating subject’s behaviors during the test taking and then to make interferences from their behaviors to explain what is going on behind the scenes (mental processes). The subjects involved in this experiment are from three different age groups. Respectably, ages for the first group consist of people in their teens, the second group had someone between twenty and thirty years of age and the last group involves people from ages fifty to sixty. Before conducting any observations, the procedures will be presented to the participants, regarding what will be asked of them and what they will be doing. Disclaimer, due to absolute confidentiality purposes names of the people who were involved in this observation will not be mentioned in this paper.
Procedure
The three different age groups of people will be asked to read the word and then to tell the observer, the color of the word and vice versa. While they are doing so, the observer will be making inferences about speed of thought processing and selective processing. Along with that, the observer will also be taking note of what the subject’s reactions and behaviors are. Below is the test, the candidates will be taking.

Questions asked during the observation are as follows:
Q: May I ask you to tell me what the words are and not the color of the words?
Q: May I ask you to tell me the color of the words?
Q: What was going on in your mind when I asked you to read the word instead of telling me what the color of the word is?
Q: What kind of suggestions do you have which would lead in helping this observation go more smoothly?
Observation (Objective) As a result of the observation conducted, most of the participants in the teens and early twenty year old groups’ reaction to



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