The Stolen Generation

Powerful Essays
Forced removal

The forced removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families was official government policy from 1909 to 1969. However the practice took place both before and after this period. Governments, churches and welfare bodies all took part.

The removal policy was managed by the Aborigines Protection Board (APB). The APB was a government board established in 1909 with the power to remove children without parental consent and without a court order. Children could be put into an institution or mission dormitory, fostered or adopted. Many children were fostered or adopted after spending time in a children’s home.

Under the White Australia and assimilation policies Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who were ‘not of full blood’ were encouraged to become assimilated into the broader society so that eventually there would be no more Indigenous people left. At the time Indigenous people were seen as an inferior race.

Children were taken from Aboriginal parents so they could be brought up ‘white’ and taught to reject their Aboriginality. Children were placed with institutions and from the 1950s began also being placed with white families. Aboriginal children were expected to become labourers or servants, so in general the education they were provided was very poor. Aboriginal girls in particular were sent to homes established by the Board to be trained in domestic service.

The lack of understanding and respect for Aboriginal people also meant that many people who supported the child removals believed that they were doing the ‘right thing’. Some people believed that Aboriginal people lived poor and unrewarding lives, and that institutions would provide a positive environment in which Aboriginal people could better themselves. The dominant racist views in the society and government also means that people believed that Aboriginal people were bad parents and that Aboriginal woman did not look after their children.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The Stolen Generation

    • 680 Words
    • 3 Pages

    but what if there was no such thing as human right, would everyone’s lives be affected by harsh cruelty? Well there are many examples of Human Rights being broken, the Stolen Generation is just one of them, and the song `Took the Children Away’ by ARCHIE ROACH, reflects on what happened to the stolen generation. The Stolen Generation was where Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders were removed from their families and ‘Snatched from their mother's breast’ by the Australian Federal and State government…

    • 680 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Stolen Generation

    • 1439 Words
    • 6 Pages

    1) Explain the Stolen Generation (when did it occur/who was responsible and why government officials believed they were justified in taking these actions). The Stolen Generation was a very lonely and depressing time for the indigenous people of Australia. It lasted an overwhelming 60 years in which an estimated 100 000 aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were forcibly removed from their families and land to be raised in homes or adopted by white families. This Policy was designed…

    • 1439 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Stolen Generation

    • 265 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The stolen generation What happened? The children who were taken away from their families have become known as the 'Stolen Generations'. Their stories have only really come to light since the mid-1990s. Before that, many non-Indigenous people had no idea what had been happening to Aboriginal families for so many years. In 1995 the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families was launched by the Labour government under Paul Keating.…

    • 265 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Stolen Generation

    • 728 Words
    • 3 Pages

    How is being a member of the stolen generation a personal trouble? How is it a public issue? If we are to look at the events endured by the Stolen Generation then we can see that they have very negative connotations from a sociological perspective on the wider Australian society. This piece will attempt to state that a link exists between the personal trauma caused to members of the Stolen Generation and why they find it difficult to integrate with wider Australian society. If a country is to…

    • 728 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Stolen Generations

    • 688 Words
    • 2 Pages

    This essay will examine an aspect of civil rights or the origin that developed the need of civil rights by focusing on the following point; the stolen generation. The 'Stolen Generations' are the generations of Aboriginal children taken away from their families by governments, churches and welfare bodies to be brought up in institutions or fostered out to white families. The reasoning behind this was to completely demolishing the aboriginal way of life that can only be passed on to their children…

    • 688 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Stolen Generation

    • 576 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Stolen Generation was a time when children, usually half-cast children of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds were taken away from their family’s in-order to assimilate the Indigenous people. The removal and policies were organised by the Aborigines Protection Board, which was formed in 1909. They had the power to remove children without a court order or parental consent and this officially lasted from 1909 to 1969, meaning that some Aboriginal people around the age of 60 have been…

    • 576 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Stolen Generations

    • 2257 Words
    • 10 Pages

    AL375 The Stolen Generations The Aboriginal people of Australian and the invading Europeans have a complex and troublesome past extending back to the European colonisation of Australia. Governmental policy in relation to the Aboriginal people has greatly changed over time. Unfortunately, until around the 1970s, the Aboriginals were regarded as inferior beings unworthy of basic human rights and, at times, life itself. One such time period was the Stolen Generations where tens of thousands of…

    • 2257 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Stolen Generation

    • 387 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The forced removal of Aboriginal and Torres Islander children was forcefully taken away from their families between the 1890’s and the 1969.The children were given to churches, missionary institutes and some children were given to white families. Most of the children never saw their families again; more than 100,000 children were removed from their families They removed children without parental consent and without a court order. They wanted these children to be brought up as a part of white families…

    • 387 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    stolen generation

    • 1045 Words
    • 5 Pages

    "Rich Girl" is a song by American recording artist Gwen Stefani (pictured) from her 2004 debut solo album, Love. Angel. Music. Baby. Produced by Dr. Dre, the track features rapper Eve, who had previously collaborated with Stefani on the 2001 single "Let Me Blow Ya Mind". "Rich Girl" is a remake of Louchie Lou & Michie One's 1993 song of the same name, which was in turn an adaptation of the Fiddler on the Roof song "If I Were a Rich Man". In the song, Stefani discusses dreams of wealth and luxury…

    • 1045 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Stolen Generation Report

    • 4496 Words
    • 18 Pages

    Report of the Stolen Generations Assessor Stolen Generations of Aboriginal Children Act 2006 February 2008 Depar tm e n t of P r e m i e r a n d C a binet Table of contents 1. 2. Introduction ...................................................... 2 Context of the legislation .......................................3 2.1 historical Context ................................................................... 3 2.2 Child Welfare and adoption laws .............................. 4…

    • 4496 Words
    • 18 Pages
    Powerful Essays