Preview

The Secret Life Of Tiger Woods Rhetorical Analysis

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
478 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
The Secret Life Of Tiger Woods Rhetorical Analysis
In the articles, “The Secret Life of Tiger Woods” by Wright Thompson, and, “Are parents ruining youth sports? Fewer kids play amid pressure” by Michael Rosenwald, they both show different ways on how parents could have a major impact on their children’s sports. In my opinion, the sacrifices many parents cause their child to take to become an “elite athlete” are not worth it because many children could lose the bond between them and their parents, or they could abandon interest in the sport entirely. In the article, “The Secret Life of Tiger Woods” by Wright Thompson, Tiger Woods had an immense love for his father, Earl Woods, ever since he was a little boy. He did not have many friends, so instead, he would talk to and play golf with his father’s military friends. He never saw his father very much other than the golf course, which is where he developed the passion for the sport. Ever since his father died, his passion has faded away, and he never seemed to be on the golf course anymore. Tiger struggled greatly at keeping the life he had before his father passed but he seemed to keep reflecting his father. This …show more content…
Fewer kids play amid pressure.” by Machael Rosenwald, the author addresses an issue widely faced by many children. Quitting sports because of the pressure their parents put on to them to keep playing to hopefully become a professional “elite athlete”. A survey was taken to see what the top factors contributing to kids happiness was. The results helped to prove the fact that children aren’t in games for winning or being the best. This is proven when the article reads, “...low on the list: playing in tournaments, cool uniforms and expensive equipment. High on the list: positive team dynamics, trying hard, positive coaching and learning”(Rosenwald 3). As this shows, children enjoy not being pushed to constantly be the best. Instead, they prefer being encouraged and not being forced into

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    High Cost Of Youth Sports

    • 948 Words
    • 4 Pages

    What if there was a world where no kid ever had to suffer with playing sports,where no one ever got hurt, where in the sports world kids were safe from danger. Although when you play sports you can get more fit and get more healthier. Competitive sports for the young risk a lot of injuries kids being hurt that they might give up on the sport that they play. Spending too much money can be a real threat to parents, some parents don’t have enough money to help their child achieve what they want to do with sports. Also spending too much time wanting to win, putting pressure on the child/children in which the child/children want to quit the sport, where sometimes little kids want to play for fun. Therefore competitive sports are bad for the young…

    • 948 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Figueroa's Framework

    • 973 Words
    • 4 Pages

    At school, peers can change adolescents’ attitudes about a sport that was previously enjoyed. Even students who are talented at a particular sport may quit it because a sporting career is not realistic or because of the social expectations of their gender. Work commitments, financial costs and equipment costs—such factors can have a negative effect on sports participation.…

    • 973 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    References: Atkinson, J. (2014, May 4). How parents are ruining youth sports - The Boston Globe. Retrieved November 26, 2014, from http://www.bostonglobe.com/magazine/2014/05/03/how-parents-are-ruining-youth-sports/vbRln8qYXkrrNFJcsuvNyM/story.html…

    • 1287 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Many believe that all of the hard work starts early. Like the saying says “he early bird gets the worm.” But is that all that sport is really about? I use to think that the answer to that question was yes! I feel that there are more disadvantages to sport specialization than there are advantages. Do you realize that sports affect us all in one way or another Whether or not you like sports has nothing to do with the whether or not it affects you. It's one thing for kids to dream of Olympic gold medals or Super Bowl rings and to work toward those goals. But it's another matter if parents are pushing their kids to do something they don't want or pressuring them to succeed in a way that’s hurtful. They may have to sacrifice other interests and give up most of the down time that allows them to just be kids. Not only are these youngsters at risk for emotional burnout, they may also develop injuries that plague them for a lifetime.…

    • 881 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Youth Athlete Burnout

    • 418 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The main issue that the field of sports faces today and in the future are gambling, drug abuse, emphasis on winning in youth sports and burnout of young athletes. The youth league has major turn games into all about winning is most important which cause athletes to burnout. The youth burnout syndrome occurs when a youth athlete has worsening performance despite intense training.Coaches and parents have pressure kids that show some talent for the sport, to show “commitment” by specializing in a single sport. The major issue of coaches and parents pressuring is the obsession with their child getting on all-state teams, scholarships and pro contracts. The result would lead to the constant high levels of physiologic or emotional stress, fatigue,…

    • 418 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Sports for children in the United States have increased dramatically over the past three decades. Many believe that parents and coaches are becoming too involved in youth sports practices. In the essay “Children Need to Play, Not Compete” by Jessica Statsky, Statsky states her opinion that children should be focused on playing the game and having fun, instead of focused on winning the game. She also states and supports how parents and coaches are becoming too involved and not letting the children play. This is resulting in physical and mental harm to the child. Statsky’s essay is convincing and very well structured. She does an excellent job supporting her opinion throughout her essay.…

    • 928 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Pushing Too Hard

    • 1920 Words
    • 8 Pages

    One of the greatest feelings a parent can experience is watching a child excel in an activity. Rightfully so, many parents encourage children to perform well in sports. The problems start when the encouragement begins to go too far. Many parents and coaches toady exceed the boundaries of encouragement, and enter a realm of abuse. A lot of this behavior will start when a parent of coach believes that they are mentoring the next superstar athlete. When parents and coaches start to look at children as major prospects the problems in youth athletics begin to become major issues.…

    • 1920 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    “Children Need to Play, Not Compete,” article by Jessica Statsky convinces adults how competitive organized sports are harmful to children. First of all, Jessica Statsky explains organized sports are not always joyful. The competitiveness sucks out the fun for kids. She states, “Adults regard Little League Baseball and PeeWee Football as a basic part of childhood, the games are not always joyous ones.” Kids have to live up to parents and coaches exceptions. Competitiveness led kids into believing that they are worth for their abilities. They will, unfortunately, adopt this habits for future. However, I believe competitiveness can be beneficial to the kids. It can encourage children to excel. But this should not affect kids self-esteem.…

    • 390 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The reasons for this can vary, from parents wishing to live out their own athletic dreams through their children, to hoping their child can reach an elite level and gain college scholarships. However, this type of mentality must be abolished. Intense year round training doesn’t make a star player, and studies have shown that “less than 1% of young athletes 6 to 17 years of age achieve elite status” (Jayanthi, Neeru et al.). Yet, despite the slim chance, a child athlete will actually make it to professional leagues, this discourages few (“Intensive Training” 1). These kind of stakes only up the ante for young athletes, who are then held to a higher standard than their athletic idols ever were.…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Chat Williams Case Study

    • 755 Words
    • 4 Pages

    I agree with Chad and the information he put out in this podcast. Parents who understand the athletic attributes needed for sports can allow children to enjoy their athletic development as they follow the right steps to improve their sports abilities. (Hutton MA & Twist, 2007). We all want the best for our…

    • 755 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the article, “Are parents ruining youth sports? Fewer kids play amid pressure,” by Michael S. Rosenwald, talked about how ruthless parents are wanting their kids to become professional athletes which is causing them to take the fun out of the game. Also, in another article, “The secret life of Tiger Woods,” by Wright Thompson explained how Tiger Woods comes across as though he is a good guy with many friends and many admirers. However if one looked deeper into his life, they could see what a mess he truly is. With this information, I chose to believe that the quest to become an “elite athlete” is ultimately not worth the sacrifices it requires. In the first article mentioned, the young kid’s parents are ruining their chances of enjoying…

    • 849 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Everyone is aware of the stories, “Young football player went to the hospital with concussion” and “Teenager breaks her leg at hockey practice” but how many of those headlines are actually a frequent occurrence? Today, this essay will examine an issue with numerous opposing opinions: Should kids participate in competitive sports? Countless people have commonly argued this topic in view of the injuries and potential stress the sports might bring. However, this essay will explain why, kids should play competitive sports. The main reasons are as follows: they teach kids life lessons, they promote a positive self image, and competitive sports keep kids active.…

    • 2064 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Youth Sports

    • 2061 Words
    • 9 Pages

    The first thing that comes to mind when you think about problems in youth sport would be the overzealous parents. The parent that goes above and beyond to push their child to his/her limits. A study conducted by the Citizens Through Sports Alliance gave what they call a “report card” showing the results of how parents effect youth sports (Emmons). This panel of experts essentially based their results on youth sports programs with ages ranging from 6-14(Emmons). Parents received low grades in the areas of a win at all costs mentality and overall parent behavior. Executive director for the Positive Coaching Alliance, Jim Thompson said,” We really hope this is a wake-up call. This is such an important part of kid’s lives and if there is something wrong with youth sports, then we ought to start thinking about the ways we can change it.”(Emmons)…

    • 2061 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Part of the reason many parents may push their children so hard on sports is because they, the parents, use their children as a way to fulfill dreams they couldn’t fulfill as children. An article by DailMail.com states, “pushy parents who go to great lengths to make their children succeed are attempting to make up for their own failed dreams, researchers have confirmed” (DailMail paragraph 2). It also states, in another article, that “‘the child's achievements may come to function as a surrogate for parents' own unfulfilled ambitions,’ said study researcher Eddie Brummelman, a doctoral psychology student at Utrecht University in the Netherlands” (Pappas paragraph 3). An article by Everyday Health claims that “psychologists have long suspected that some parents try to fulfill their unfulfilled achievements through their kids, and now a study confirms it” (Everyday Health paragraph 1). These multiple pieces of evidence can lead us to the conclusion that millions of parents are chasing lost dreams through their children.…

    • 861 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Sports parents, in the past few years, have soiled their reputations in public displays at their child's sporting events. Parents have been seen negatively treating their child, for the solemn purpose of them not wanting to be there. Parents have been called overbearing, annoying, simpleminded, tyrannical, and cavalier. Many adults are tired of the negative feedback of these, as so they say, "Grown" adult parents, and many often wonder, "What are the effects on children whose parents push them into sports?"…

    • 1246 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays