The Scientific Revolution on the Enlightenment Era

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The Scientific Revolution’s Effect on the Enlightenment Era

The scientific revolution started in the late in the late 1600’s and was followed by the enlightenment era. The scientific revolution scientists challenged the church’s teachings and proved them wrong in many ways. That made people open their eyes and start to question all of their leaders including those who believed in divine right. With that said, the enlightenment eera couldn’t have happened without the scientific revolution happening before because the scientists of the scientific revolution inspired the enlightenment philosophers, the scientists of the scientific revolution also made the philosophers of the enlightenment think differently and question their rulers, and lastly, new inventions created during the scientific revolution helped spread the ideas of the enlightenment philosophers.
The scientific revolution scientists inspired the philosophers of the enlightenment era. An example of this happening is in the beliefs of John Locke. John Locke said in his writing “Essay Concerning Human Understanding” that he believed everyone is born Tabula Rasa. People are born neither good nor evil. He said "Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper void of all characters, without any ideas. How comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it with an almost endless variety? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge? To this I answer, in one word, from experience" (Locke, 26). In that quote, Locke explains that people become good or evil by what they are exposed to in life. This made him believe that the majority of people in the world are good and that is why he started advocating for a democracy instead of an absolute monarchy. Hobbes on the other hand, believed that everyone is born evil and selfish. That let him to advocate for an absolute monarchy. Both men started with a hypothesis; and although

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