The Role Of Drug Trafficking In Colombia

Good Essays
A large portion of FARC’s profits now come from drug trafficking; however, they weren’t major drug traffickers when Plan Colombia was first implemented. Peter Dale Scott, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley and author of several books on this topic, noted that the Colombian government estimated in 2001 that paramilitary groups controlled 40% of the cocaine exports; whereas the FARC controlled only 2.5%. The FARC had been more involved in the “taxing” of the drug trade, but they have since significantly increased their role in production by forcing farmers to grow cocaine. Economics and geopolitics are the clear reasons why the U.S. government implemented such a flawed drug policy which targets the FARC while turning a blind eye to the attacks committed by right-wing paramilitary groups. …show more content…
As a result, U.S. corporate interests in Colombia have benefitted from these counternarcotics programs. BP, Exxon, and Occidental lobbied heavily for this program, although Occidental arguably benefited the most from the program. In 2003 and 2004, Congress set aside $98 million and $110 million respectively in federal funds for a U.S. trained Colombian Special Forces brigade to protect Occidental’s Caño Limón pipeline. The 480-mile Caño Limón pipeline had been a prime target for the FARC when Plan Colombia was implemented and those conditions remain today as there were literally 130 violent attacks at the pipeline committed by the FARC in 2014

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Javdani mentions that U.S. money being sent to Colombia is ineffective in its purpose, which is to enforce order over the high drug activity that rules Colombia. Because Colombia produces a majority of the world’s cocaine & heroine, the U.S believes that putting an end to the growth of the coca, a plant used for making cocaine & heroine, can stop the use of drugs in the…

    • 644 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Pablo Escobar

    • 1642 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The paper traces Escobar's life from humble peasant beginnings to powerful cocaine drug dealer and kingpin. The paper discusses the sound financial decisions Escobar made as well as the way he invested in legitimate projects using the funds he gained illegally. The paper explores the influence Escobar had and the way he worked, ultimately unsuccessfully, to establish a no-extradition clause into the Colombian constitution.…

    • 1642 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Counterterrorism Paper

    • 4321 Words
    • 12 Pages

    Colombia's government and the rebel group FARC reached an agreement May 17, 2014 on ending the illegal drug trade. The deal called for FARC to cooperate with the government in convincing farmers to grow crops other than coca, which is used to make cocaine. The announcement was made Friday in Havana where the two sides have been negotiating an end to a 50-year-old insurgency. Colombia was the world's leading producer of cocaine until Peru recently overtook it in cultivation of coca. The cocaine industry has been the major source of funds for the Marxist rebel group and a cause of crime and instability in the South American country. With the agreement on ending the drug trade, the two sides have resolved three of the six points on their agenda. Previously FARC and the government had reached deals on agrarian reform and political participation.…

    • 4321 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Silver or Lead

    • 331 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Our government tries to fight too much from the wrong side as Javdani tells us “In an attempt to find the quickest way around a complicated problem, each year the United States sends billions in aid dollars every year to the governments of Latin American ‘drug source’ countries” (403). This statement by Javdani shows just how lopsided the war on drugs is. Our government believes if we bring the fight to the source, we can stop the drugs from coming into our country and therefore win the drug war. As Javdani tells us, this is not the best approach as most landowners in these Latin American countries do not have a choice of whether or not their land is cultivated for drugs. Drug lords control vast areas of these Latin American countries with impunity. Our aid dollars and military equipment are not enough for these governments to secure the country sides for their citizens, lack of training and support for law enforcement combined with widespread government corruption ensure that the majority of our aid dollars to these countries fail to stop the drug flow.…

    • 331 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    War on Drugs Policy Paper

    • 2390 Words
    • 10 Pages

    The United States and Mexico are fighting what could be called a never-ending war, the war on the illegal drug trade. Drugs flow across the US-Mexico border seemingly unrestricted, even though both countries spend billions of dollars each year attempting to halt the flow of drugs. Drug cartels in Mexico operate with impunity, and have little regard for laws, regulations, and human life. Over 35,000 people on both sides of the border have been killed by these drug cartels since 2006, a number that continues to grow each day (Military, 1988). The flow of illegal drugs into our nation represents a major risk to our national security, not only from the drug themselves, but also in that the technologies and methods used to transport drugs can also be used to transport people and weapons into the country, giving terrorists another way of striking the United States. Terrorist organizations also use money generated through drug trafficking to finance terrorist activities here and abroad, further increasing the likelihood of a terrorist incident within our borders. This policy paper will identify what military forces are used in the drug war, new technologies available to increase border security, political options to assist the United States and Mexico in stopping the drug trade, and options for reducing the demand for drugs in the United States.…

    • 2390 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    They represent the rural poor against Colombia’s wealthy classes and oppose U.S. influence in Colombia, the privatization of natural resources, multinational corporations, and rightist violence is the reason they formed The FARC.…

    • 670 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Proposition 19

    • 2264 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Proposition 19 Could Change Colombia’s Drug Policy Cato Institute. By Juan Carlos Hidalgo October 26th 2010…

    • 2264 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    1970's Drug Abuse

    • 1036 Words
    • 5 Pages

    One of the attempts of the United States to stop influx of smuggled marijuana from Mexico was under “Operation Intercept” in 1969. The operation was made because of belief that Marijuana was being streamlined into the United States from Mexico and it was to blame. This policy of supply drug control is one that the United States adopted for many countries. The United States adopted a policy of containment rather than treatment. Another strategy used by the United States was the aerial spraying of drug crops in Mexico. Both the success in Operation Intercept and in aerial eradication were short lived as more crops and drugs would be cultivated again and replaced. The main reason for these policies that were more offensive toward other countries, rather than reflective, was because politicians during this time believed getting rid of the drugs at the cultivations source would be the least costly option rather than brainstorming on plans to improve the citizens back home who were losing themselves more to poverty and misery due to the consumption of drugs. Also most of the aid that was budgeted for the United States to use on the attempt to diminish drug trafficking abroad was not used to fund international organizations against drugs. Only 3 percent of this budget…

    • 1036 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Regardless of what people might think Colombia has strongly fought the drug trafficking for more than 60 years. The Army has been fighting capos, Cartels, and guerillas who switched his communist ideology for terrorist ideology. Now a days the narco-guerrilla is supporting economic in drug trafficking. On the other hand, this battle has brought a negative impact in the Army. According to some studies made by the Army Health Direction: “The curiosity is usually the beginning of this problem and the lack of education, which has influenced some privates to believe that marijuana makes them stronger, helps them to improve their performance, physical and mental”. This belief has made a stereotype and has influence the new generation…

    • 1276 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    We will be discussing drug trafficking in the United States. I selected this topic because as a teen-ager I had a few run-ins with the drug trafficking industry as I was trying to find myself. It is fast money which is what is enticing about it. I have since learned the dangers that I put myself through. Now I try to educate others so they do not make the same mistakes that I made. Fortunately for me, I was able to get out and change my life before it was too late.…

    • 368 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Central America’s failing economic systems have left many of its citizens unemployed, leading many men, women, and children to become enticed by trafficked sex workers in a desperate attempt to provide for their families. Central America has now emerged as the largest market for trafficked individuals in the modern era. Central Americans once living on stable household incomes have experienced deep socioeconomic uncertainty and insecurity prompted by the excessive violence and corruption within local governments. Human trafficking has been able to succeed in regions like Central America because there is little opportunity for social nor economic advancement. In many impoverished Central American nations, dissipating job opportunities have left…

    • 427 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    The international drug trade from Latin American states is having an impact on a global scale. The trafficking of drugs along with corruptness and murder is an international conflict that is being fought daily. There are many aspects of the drug war from Mexico and other Latin American states which have effects on United States policy as well as policies from other countries that participate in the global suppression of illegal drugs.…

    • 1468 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Better Essays

    As Americans in the United States face the war on drugs, we struggle to get a grip on the killer of a nation. It seems as if illegal narcotics are killing and destroying families at an alarming rate. Since the early eighties, children have dropped out of school to make a profit from this dream killer. Many parents were either addicted to these illegal drugs, or in denial of their corruption. In many legal cases you hear the convicted say, “We don’t have poppy fields in North America,” which leads our government to do critical speculation. Where do these drugs come from? How are they entering our states and destroying families? These are the questions that many have. Upon research, it has become clear that the Mexican Cartels are the main and biggest contributors to the narcotic empire. Pushing illegal drugs from Mexico through the border of Lerado, Mexico and Lerado, Texas has been the success of these cartels in distributing drugs into the United States. Government officials face the horror of senseless deaths as the fight for War on Drugs begins.…

    • 1059 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    The scope and nature of the problem for this research paper is Drug Trafficking in the United States. The specific claim is that is the U.S. were able to drastically reduce the amount of drug trafficking, then the amount of people using drugs would have no choice but to decrease because the drugs would be harder to get. Also, if the U.S. were to legalize certain drugs, then the crime rate and abuse would probably decrease as well because the “glitz and glamour” would be gone. (A lot of people seem to want or go after things they shouldn’t, or are illegal).…

    • 872 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Colombia: Cocaine Trade

    • 3226 Words
    • 13 Pages

    Marcy, William L. The Politics of Cocaine: How U.S. Foreign Policy Has Created a Thriving Drug Industry in Central and South America. Chicago, IL: Lawrence Hill, 2010. Flagship Login. Web. .…

    • 3226 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Powerful Essays