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The Rise Of Anti-Semitism In Nazi Germany

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The Rise Of Anti-Semitism In Nazi Germany
Many stigmatic assumptions have been affiliated with Nazi Germany, warping the truth about what really transpired during the rise of the Third Reich. The public opinion of German residents towards the Jews in the early years was especially fabricated, with false rumors that the majority of the population already had a burning hatred towards the minorities, well before Hitler’s election. The development of modern anti-Semitism in Germany did not explode overnight, but was a delicate process. The newly appointed Chancellor, Adolf Hitler, took careful steps, in the form of discriminatory behavior and laws, that planted the seed of distrust and anti-Semitism in the German populous. Over the period of 1933 to 1939, with the domination of the Nazi …show more content…
The Nazis announced their intent to make “Jews second-class citizens and revoke most of their political rights.” These laws, called the Nuremberg Laws, also forbade sexual relations or marriages with any Aryan person with a Jew, which was seen as a committing a crime against the pure German blood. Jews were no longer seen as citizens, but rather as burdens on the government. They were stripped of their citizenship, and were expected to leave the country as soon as possible. Killing the Jews was not even considered at the time, and all Hitler wanted was for them to emigrate elsewhere. The Nuremberg Laws affected all people who had Jewish ancestry, and not just those who were actively practicing. These laws defined a Jew as someone who had three or four Jewish ancestors, not considering the fact if that person considered themselves Jewish or not. For the first time, Nazi Germany decided that blood was the only deciding factor in determining Aryan status, and converting to Christianity was no longer considered a reasonable option. The Nuremberg Laws were met with little resistance from the German people, because Hitler had promised them a better and powerful Germany, and had actually acted on those promises. The “average German felt renewed hope and pride, the face of Germany seemed brighter, more at peace with itself.” The laws were going to continue to bolster Germany, so the citizens felt that Hitler’s plans for Germany were onto something positive and

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