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The Racial Segregation And The Civil Rights Movement

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The Racial Segregation And The Civil Rights Movement
We must learn to live together as brothers or we will perish together as fools, do you ever wonder how the racial segregation started and why people nonviolent boycott and why the civil rights had to be made. How the racial segregation started this was changed several decades later with three amendments in 1870 it gave black people the same voting rights as white people , In the late 1940s and early 1950s lawyers for the national association for the advancement for color people . They culminated in brown vs board of education of toperia, Kansas Supreme Court sanctioned racial segregation by allowing segregated but equal facilities for blacks and whites. New laws were passed to effectively prevent blacks from voting and to rein force segregation practice. …show more content…
Two local Baptist ministers, Martin Luther King Jr .and Ralph Abernathy, led a year on a nonviolent boycott of the bus system that eventually force the bus company to desegregate its buses. Similar protest actions soon spread to other communities in south, King became the leading vice of the civil rights movement. Civil rights , in 1960 a group pf black college students in Greensboro , N.N insisted on being served a meal at a segregated lunch counter , this was one of the first of the movement many prominent civil rights . By September of that year some 70,000 students both black and white were thought to have participant in the movement, 3,600 of the participation were arrested for their participation. The civil rights movement won several important legal victories, July 2 Johnson signed the civil rights act in to

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