The Qing Dynasty

Powerful Essays
12/2/11
World Civ. China
9:55 Mon, Wed

Part A , Number 2
The Qing Dynasty, like all the Chinese Dynasties, began with an expectation of success. The Zhou Dynasty found such success within the “100 schools of thought”, while the Qin found success within trade and exploration which in the end, unified China (Russ). However, the Qing Dynasty found a different way to make their mark with the development of the Chinese Dictionary, forming Banner systems and population increase. Nevertheless, while all of the Dynasties strived for success, they ended with the ultimate failure; by not obtaining the mandate of Heaven. Throughout the history of the region many Dynasties attempted to push China in a positive, powerful position, yet none succeeded. The Qing Dynasty marked the final dynasty effort in China. Due to demographics, foreign influences and corruption the Chinese were progressively pulled away from the Dynasty influence to form a powerful republic. Despite the effort to be a powerful force within China, the Qing Dynasty became known as the final Dynasty. The Qing Dynasty, despite all effort to maintain control, fell prey to the three main crises of the 19th century: demographic issues, foreign issues and corruption in government. Population growth contributed to many political and social issues within the eighteenth century. China’s population doubled from 150 million to 300 million during the Qing Dynasty (184,Ebey), which resulted in a higher demand for food, land, and livelihood to meet the growing burden of the population.. In order to meet this need the Qing Dynasty found a temporary solution within global trade. While the solution seemed to be a successful solution, yet after time and progressive implications, trade efforts ended up having a negative effect on the dynasty and region. China was a source of global luxuries such as tea, silk, porcelain, cloisonné, wallpaper, and folding fans which drew the European trade with China (BOOK).Yet, the



Cited: Chang, Jung. Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China. New York: Touchstone, 2003. Print. Ebrey, Patricia B. China: A Cultural, Social, and Political History. Charles Hartford. Print. Russ, Jana. "World Civ. China." Class Lecure. University of Akron, Akron. 2011. Lecture. To Live. Dir. Zhang Yimou. Perf. Ge You, Gong Li,. Shanghai Film Studio, 1994. DVD.

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