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The Patriot Act

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The Patriot Act
Federal Acts and Social Justice – The Patriot Homeland Security Act’s
On September 11, 2001, 2,996 innocent people lost their lives and left more than 6,000 others seriously wounded. This horrendous act of terrorism waged against the United States, on American soil, forever changed the country. After the initial disbelief and shock had subsided, the anger rose and turned into rage. American citizens were united and demanded action be taken to prevent such an event from ever occurring again. Hence, the Patriot Act and the Homeland Security Act enactment was to protect the country against terrorism, activities within the United States that involve acts dangerous to human life.
The USA PATRIOT Act (Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing
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The act focused on four ways to improve counter-terrorism efforts. First, the Patriot Act allows investigators to use the tools that were already available to investigate organized crime and drug trafficking. It permits law enforcement officials to use surveillance against more crimes of terror, permits federal agents to track sophisticated terrorists trained to evade detection, and it allows law enforcement to conduct investigations without alerting terrorists, enables federal agents to ask a court for an order to obtain business records in cases involving national security and terrorism. Secondly, the Patriot Act facilitated information sharing and cooperation among government agencies so that they can better "connect the dots.", By removing significant legal barriers that prevented the law enforcement, intelligence, and national defense communities from talking and coordinating their work to protect national security. Thirdly, the Patriot Act updated the law to reflect new technologies and new threats; law enforcement officials were not able …show more content…
Judges have been issuing them for decades, usually, in situations where there are critical reasons not to provide immediate notice of an impending search. These warrants have been squarely upheld by courts nationwide in a variety of cases, drug trafficking investigations to cases involving child pornography. The Supreme Court held in United States v. Dalia, that surreptitious entry, with a judicial warrant does not violate the Fourth Amendment, rejecting the argument that it was unconstitutional. Since the Dalia challenge, three federal courts of appeals have considered the constitutionality of delayed-notice search warrants, and all three have upheld them. In 1986, United States v. Freitas, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals considered the constitutionality of a search warrant allowing covert entry to find out the status of a methamphetamine laboratory without revealing the existence of the investigation, the court ruled that the search was legally permissible. Advanced technology has permanently changed our world. The world of today is continually evolving; rapid communication, state of the art technology, and the ability to travel from continent to continent. However, technology has also made us more vulnerable to weapons of mass destruction and terrorism. When the Framers of the Constitution established a system that

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