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The Omnivore's Dilemma By David Pollan

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The Omnivore's Dilemma By David Pollan
According to my section of the novel, Personal, the universal topic does not coincide with every young American’s existence. The universal topic in the section Personal is how to hunt and kill for your own food and how to find the right fruits and fungi to eat in the wilderness. Most young americans don’t have to worry about any of this. Almost every piece of food is essentially handed to them. Hunting is a game to some of us, not a lifestyle or a necessity for life. The overall universal topic is how Omnivore’s obviously have a dilemma when it comes to choosing their own foods. Most young Americans can easily identify what kind of food they want for lunch or breakfast and sometimes they don’t even have a choice. For this reason, I disagree with with the statement that young Americans have trouble finding what they want to eat. …show more content…
Pollan’s work in “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” does not resonate practically anything in my life. I buy food from the grocery store and cook it at home or I will go out to dinner. Its when I go out to dinner that I run into problems with the choice of food that I want to eat. While in the section, Personal, the only problem with the food choice is if it is poisonous or not.Those possibilities, I usually never encounter, unlike Pollan, who had to deal with it in the

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