The Newspaper

Topics: Newspaper, Journalism, Mass media Pages: 59 (18964 words) Published: July 24, 2013
News

A newspaper is one of the most common ways to receive the latest news. News is the communication of selected[1] information on current events which is presented by print, broadcast, Internet, or word of mouth to a third-party or mass audience. Contents [hide]

1 Etymology
2 History
3 Forms of news
3.1 Newspaper
3.2 Online journalism
4 Newsworthiness
5 New ecology of news
6 See also
7 References
8 Further reading
9 External links
Etymology[edit]

The English word "news" developed in the 14th century as a special use of the plural form of "new".[2] In Middle English, the equivalent word was newes, like the French nouvelles and the German neues. Similar developments are found in the Slavic languages—the Czech and Slovak noviny (from nový, "new"), the cognate Polish nowiny and Russian novosti—and in the Celtic languages: the Welsh newyddion (from newydd) and the Cornish nowodhow (from nowydh). History[edit]

Before the invention of newspapers in the early 17th century, official government bulletins and edicts were circulated at times in some centralized empires.[3] The first documented use of an organized courier service for the diffusion of written documents is in Egypt, where Pharaohs used couriers for the diffusion of their decrees in the territory of the State (2400 BC).[4] This practice almost certainly has roots in the much older practice of oral messaging and may have been built on a pre-existing infrastructure. In Ancient Rome, Acta Diurna, or government announcement bulletins, were made public by Julius Caesar. They were carved in metal or stone and posted in public places. In China, early government-produced news sheets, called tipao, circulated among court officials during the late Han dynasty (second and third centuries AD). Between 713 and 734, the Kaiyuan Za Bao ("Bulletin of the Court") of the Chinese Tang Dynasty published government news; it was handwritten on silk and read by government officials. In 1582 there was the first reference to privately published newssheets in Beijing, during the late Ming Dynasty.[5] In Early modern Europe, increased cross-border interaction created a rising need for information which was met by concise handwritten newssheets. In 1556, the government of Venice first published the monthly Notizie scritte, which cost one gazetta.[6] These avvisi were handwritten newsletters and used to convey political, military, and economic news quickly and efficiently to Italian cities (1500–1700)—sharing some characteristics of newspapers though usually not considered true newspapers.[7] Due to low literacy rates, news was at times disseminated by town criers. Relation aller Fürnemmen und gedenckwürdigen Historien, from 1605, is recognized as the world's first newspaper.[8] The oldest news agency is the Agence France-Presse (AFP).[9] It was founded in 1835 by a Parisian translator and advertising agent, Charles-Louis Havas as Agence Havas. In modern times, printed news had to be phoned into a newsroom or brought there by a reporter, where it was typed and either transmitted over wire services or edited and manually set in type along with other news stories for a specific edition. Today, the term "breaking news" has become trite as commercial broadcasting United States cable news services that are available 24-hours a day use live satellite technology to bring current events into consumers' homes as the event occurs. Events that used to take hours or days to become common knowledge in towns or in nations are fed instantaneously to consumers via radio, television, mobile phone, and the Internet. Forms of news[edit]

Newspaper[edit]
Main article: Newspaper
Most large cities in the United States historically had morning and afternoon newspapers. As the media evolved and news outlets increased to the point of near over-saturation, most afternoon newspapers were shut down. Morning newspapers have been gradually losing circulation, according to reports advanced by the...

References: By: William Hartson
Published: Fri, May 3, 2013
10. The first crossword in a British newspaper was published in the Sunday Express on November 2, 1924.
FACTS about NEWSPAPERS……
Posted on May 22, 2012 by RJI
3. The first modern newspapers were products of western European countries like Germany (publishing Relation in 1605), France (Gazette in 1631), Belgium (Nieuwe Tijdingen in 1616) and England (the London Gazette, founded in 1665.
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