The Negative Emotional Impact Of Adoption

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Adoption:
The Negative Emotional Impact of Adoption

Research Writing

Introduction

Growing up there is one point in time when all children wish they had different parents or wished they could be adopted by adults who are “cool, understandable, and rich” because out parents seemed to always find a way to ruin our lives. Unfortunately this is no wish for some children, being adopted by strangers is some children’s reality. Adoption is viewed as a lifetime commitment to raise babies or children who are not biologically yours into the best person they can be. People who adopt get that great sense of satisfaction that they reached out and changed a person’s life. Even though the adopters get that great sense of satisfaction,
…show more content…
Researchers concur that there are negative effects of adoption. These effects can be stressful and cause grief. Researchers than explain different solutions as to how to deal with adoptees that do experience these harmful effects. The researchers do agree that adoption can have a harmful effect on adoptees; it can cause grief, stress, and make him/her to act out in aggression and rage unnecessarily. The only way to cope and help an adoptee is to seek professional help such as therapy and different exercises that will help them express themselves in a controlled manner and …show more content…
(n.d.) "Grief and Loss:
A Psychosocial Model of Adoption Adjustment." American Adoption Congress. Web. 16 Oct. 2011. .

Carangelo, Lori (2005) "Adopted Child Syndrome (ACS): Its History and Relevance
Today." Americans for Open Records. Amfor.net. Web. 19 Oct. 2011. http://www.amfor.net/acs/

Carangelo, Lori (2005). "Statistics of Adoption." Americans for
Open Records. Ed. Lori Carangelo. 2005. Web. 9 Nov. 2011. .

Child Welfare Information Gateway. (2004) “Impact of Adoption on Adopted
Persons: A Factsheet for Families.” Child Welfare Information Gateway. Child Welfare Information Gateway. Web. 06 Oct. 2011, from http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/f_adimpact.cfm Grabe, Pamela V (1990). Adoption Resources for Mental Health Professionals. New
Brunswick, N.J., U.S.A.: Transaction, 1990. Print.

Lerner, Mark. "Adoption Stress and International Adoption." Adoption Doctors - Pre-
Adoption Medical Consultations. Adoptiondoctors.com. Web. 13 Nov. 2011. .

Moe, B. A. (1998). Adoption: A Reference Handbook. Santa Barbara, CA:
ABC-CLIO.

Reach Out Australia (2010). "Adoption - Coping with Finding out You Are Adopted

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