The Montgomery Bus Boycott

Better Essays
The Montgomery Bus Boycott brought together 45,000 members of the black community in Montgomery, Alabama. This was made possible through careful planning, organization and cooperation among a few important groups of people. The Women’s Political Council (WPC), the black churches of Montgomery and The Montgomery Improvement Association MIA) were the three main institutions behind the success of the boycott. The Women’s Political Council was the first suggest the idea of a bus boycott in order to gain better treatment while riding the Montgomery buses. This idea soon gained support from other black members of the Montgomery community. The WPC’s main role in the days leading to the boycott was distributing circulars in black churches around Montgomery containing details of the one day bus boycott that was to happen on December 5, 1955. This helped to spread the word to a large number of citizens along with church leaders. The participation and cooperation among leaders and congregations of black churches was crucial throughout the boycott. Not only did they “serve as channels of communication” according to Robinson, they also provided “moral support and Christian leadership”. The boycott gave black ministers and their congregations a reason to unite regardless of denomination. The black churches also provided large gathering spaces for leaders of the movement and citizens to meet. On Friday December 2, hundreds of leaders gathered at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church to organize the boycott that was to take place on the coming Monday. At the meeting transportation logistics were worked out and it was decided that another meeting would take place Monday night after the boycott. This meeting was to take place at Holt Street Baptist Church, the most spacious church in Montgomery. Once again the WPC created flyers and spread the word of the meeting. Leaders wanted to calm members of the community after the boycott, as well as gain feedback about it success. Over

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Montgomery Bus Boycott

    • 813 Words
    • 4 Pages

    History essay: Montgomery bus boycott There was once a time when blacks were only slaves in America, they had no rights and no freedom. Nowadays segregation has been abolished, racism and discrimination have been broken down and blacks are now able to live their lives free as equal citizens in the American society. Blacks in America did not get these civil rights overnight; it was a long and hard fought path to freedom. There were many important events, which helped to give blacks civil rights…

    • 813 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Montgomery Bus Boycott

    • 514 Words
    • 3 Pages

    events: The Brown vs the Board of Education ruling by the Supreme Court and Ms Rosa Parks and the Montgomery bus boycott (for a very moving film about the latter, see "The Long Walk Home." (see the 2nd link below, please) "But in the mid-1950s, two historic events heralded the beginning of the modern civil rights struggle: the U.S. Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education ruling and the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The 1954 Brown ruling occurred at the height of the McCarthy’s witch-hunt and the Cold War…

    • 514 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Montgomery Bus Boycott

    • 899 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Montgomery Bus Boycott was an extremely powerful people’s movement that began December 5, 1955, lasted 381 days, and ultimately changed African-Americans’ history forever. During this time the African Americans of Montgomery walked or made car pools to get to their destination in order to avoid the racially segregated public vehicles. The intent of this movement was to go up against racial segregation in public transportation as well as stand up for black civil rights as a whole. An African American…

    • 899 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Montgomery Bus Boycott

    • 5270 Words
    • 22 Pages

    The Montgomery Bus Boycott The Montgomery bus boycott changed the way people lived and reacted to each other. The American civil rights movement began a long time ago, as early as the seventeenth century, with blacks and whites all protesting slavery together. The peak of the civil rights movement came in the 1950's starting with the successful bus boycott in Montgomery Alabama. The civil rights movement was lead by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who preached nonviolence and love for your enemy…

    • 5270 Words
    • 22 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Montgomery Bus Boycott was one of the major events in history and one of the most successful boycotts in history. The event took place in December 5th 1955-December 20th 1956. It started when Rosa Parks was arrested when she wouldn’t give up her seat to a white person. She was the 3rd person to be arrested for not giving her seat up. After that the black community made an organization called Montgomery Improvement Association. The black community elected Martin Luther King Jr. as the president…

    • 299 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The next ethnic group is African Americans from the Montgomery Bus Boycott, March of Washington, freedom summer, and Selma March all for their hope of equality. In Alabama there was segregation laws all over the state the separated whites from blacks, and the state bus was no different (2). The Montgomery Bus Boycott started because Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man (2). The law states that blacks must give up their seats for a white man in the black section if there isn’t enough…

    • 458 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    a white man. This event would go on to ignite the Montgomery bus boycott.…

    • 1790 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a protest that took place shortly after an African- American woman, Rosa Parks, wouldn’t give up her seat, to a white man, on a Montgomery Bus. The Montgomery Bus Boycott meant that African- Americans would refuse to ride the buses in Montgomery, Alabama to protest segregated seating. Rosa Parks was arrested and fined for not giving up her seat. The boycott began on the day of Rosa Park’s court hearing and lasted 381 days. In 1955, African Americans still had to be…

    • 480 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The course of the Montgomery Bus boycott was made up of various significant events. It all began with Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat on the Montgomery Bus on the afternoon of December 1st 1955. She was taken to jail, fingerprinted and was allowed to use the phone. This is when Rosa Parks made contact with the Black civil rights leaders and when they began to take action on there plan to boycott Montgomery busses. This was the beginning of the protest against segregation. The protest began…

    • 307 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Montgomery Bus Boycott The Montgomery Bus Boycott was started by a woman who stood up against unjust segregation by sitting down. It officially started on December 5,1955, because an African American woman named Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man. It was started by the Montgomery Improvement Association, who created themselves for this purpose only. It continued for 381 days, a little over a year, until bus segregation was declared unconstitutional. The Montgomery Bus Boycott…

    • 827 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays