The Lottery

Topics: Short story, Ritual, The Lottery Pages: 5 (1789 words) Published: February 4, 2014
The Lottery Thesis Statements and Important Quotes
Below you will find four outstanding thesis statements for “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson that can be used as essay starters or paper topics. All five incorporate at least one of the themes in “The Lottery” and are broad enough so that it will be easy to find textual support, yet narrow enough to provide a focused clear thesis statement. These thesis statements offer a short summary of “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson in terms of different elements that could be important in an essay. You are, of course, free to add your own analysis and understanding of the plot of “The Lottery” or themes to them for your essay. Using the essay topics below in conjunction with the list of important quotes from “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson at the bottom of the page, you should have no trouble connecting with the text and writing an excellent essay. Click Here for a Detailed Plot Summary of “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #1: A Delightful Village Conducting Civic Activities : Contrast in “The Lottery” One of the most devastating and skillful aspects of Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” is that it consistently topples reader expectations about what should happen next or even at all. At first glance, the reader is given a story title that invokes, quite naturally, a sense of hope—the expectation that someone is going to win something. The first few paragraphs further confirm the sense of hope; it is a beautiful summer day, the grass is green, the flowers are blooming, kids out of school are playing…but then we start to see that something is amiss in this land of perfection, plenty, and hope. We are then told by the narrator of “The Lottery” that the official of the lottery is doing a “civic” duty, which we come to find out is aiding in the selection of someone to be stoned by his or her peers, perhaps even to death. Throughout the short story, contrast is everywhere, even from the names of Mr. Summers and Mr. Graves. For this essay on “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, choose a few instances that provide contrast of reader expectations versus the grim reality and analyze them carefully. Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #2: “Lottery in June, Corn Be Heavy Soon” The ritual and traditions of the lottery in Shirley Jackson’s story seem to be just as old as the town itself, especially since most of the residents don’t recall any of the old rituals, even the Old Man Warner, who is “celebrating” his 77th lottery. This means that they are archaic in some ways and rooted in traditions of superstitions that seem to involve crops and human sacrifice. During the Salem Witch Trials in early America, one of the most common complaints about presumed “witches” was that they were responsible for bad harvests, thus in many ways “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson can be seen as a metaphor for the trials in colonial New England. Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #3: Tradition and Ritual in “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson There is a great degree of tension about the rituals that surround the Lottery in Shirley Jackson’s short story. On the one hand, there is great enough reverence for this ages-old tradition to continue on as it has for years even though there were some murmurs of dissent among the crowd as some recognized that other communities had done away with their lotteries. Still, almost out of fear or superstition or both, the lottery continues to exist but most of the ceremony behind the ritual has been lost. What emerges is a little shoddy, there is no formal chant and the box itself doesn’t even have a place of honor, instead it is just scooted around the village. So much has been lost about the initial ritual that the oldest man in the village gets upset that things are not like they used to be. In short, the lottery is more of a tradition rather than a ritual at the point we witness in the story but out of respect and fear for tradition, the townsfolk are more than...

Cited: Jackson, Shirley.  "The Lottery."  Literature and the Writing Process.  Elizabeth McMahan, Susan X Day, and Robert Funk.  5th ed.  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice, 1999.  74-79. 
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"Religious Symbols and Symbolism in Shirley Jackson 's The Lottery."123HelpMe.com. 04 Feb 2014
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