The Legacy of Malthus

Good Essays
Topics: India, Poverty
The Legacy of Malthus

This movie looks into the issue of poverty prevalent in rural India. Deepa Dhanraj takes us from one corner of rural India where poverty persists to the Scottish highs which witnessed highland clearances in the 19th century. Scottish high landlords had legal claim over the common land on which shared croppers survived. Landlords rented the land to tenants who further let it to sub tenants. At the end of 18th century, volume sheep farming for wool and meat became immensely profitable than renting it to shared croppers in Scottish highs. The landlords claimed that due to increased unchecked population growth the produce from the land was insufficient to sustain the population. Shared croppers were legally and forcefully evicted from the land. There was misery, starvation and cycle of poverty amongst the evicted people by the more powerful who had law and authorities on their side. Many died, thousands migrated outside England, and some were allotted land along the shores which was uncultivable while others were displaced internally to big cities in England as cheap labor.

Per Malthus,
Malthus further claimed that the strain that the increased numbers place on a country's resources also makes life more difficult for members of the middle class and the upper classes and threatens to drag them into the pool of suffering that rightly belongs to the lot of the poor.

Deepa Dhanraj rebuts this perception that overpopulation lies at the root of poverty problem. She draws a parallel of misery inflicted on the poor people of Scottish high to the poor in the Indian scenario.

She is right in claiming so since the poorer section of Indian society who does not have its own cultivable land are forced to live life of poverty and misery. Conditions of people belonging to lower caste are much worse because of the caste system. For centuries, caste hierarchy in Indian society made sure that millions were deprived of access to basic resources in

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Thomas Malthus

    • 4238 Words
    • 17 Pages

    An Essay on the principle of Population Thomas Malthus, in the early 19th century published an essay on the principle of population as it affects the future improvement of the society with remarks on the Speculations of Mr. Godwin, M. Condorcet, and Other Writers. He criticized the views of the Utopians who believed that life could and would definitely improve for humans on earth. Populations are growing most rapidly where such growth can be afforded the least — where pollution, resource shortages…

    • 4238 Words
    • 17 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Thomas Malthus

    • 529 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Thomas Malthus In 1798, Thomas Malthus published a book called “An Essay on the Principle of Population. This whole book is on the science of predicting populations and finding what factors, and in what ways, affect the population. There are some topics of population factors that are discussed in greater detail in his book. A great portion of the book is exploring his theory of the Iron Law of Proportion. This is basically the idea that a growing population would cause a rising supply of labour…

    • 529 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Miracle or Malthus?

    • 1349 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Miracle or Malthus? The Economist December 17th, 2011 Lucca Zachmann Development economics, Fall 2012 Sciences Po, Paris, France Summary Africa’s demographic structure is globally unique: Fertility rates are generally considerably above replacement level, mortality rates are among the highest in the world and the continent tops the list of new HIV infections. Unlike any other continent Africa’s population structure does not develop as it would according to the classic demographic transition…

    • 1349 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    TTh Thomas Malthus and John Stuart Mill Date accomplished: 8/3/13 Class schedule: MWF 9:30-10:30AM Contributing group members: *BASIC REFERENCES: lecture files and linked chapter readings from "The Worldly Philosophers” (6th ed., by Robert Heilbroner) in the Links section of the egroup YOU MAY ALSO DO ADDITIONAL RESEARCH. ALWAYS CITE REFERENCES AT THE END OF YOUR PAPER. Always answer in your own words. 1. List down all the key variables in Thomas Malthus’ Theory of Population…

    • 976 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Thomas Malthus & ZPG

    • 566 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Thomas Malthus and ZPG World Population is constantly increasing at an exponential rate due to the industrial revolution. Many don’t realize the after-effects of such happenings. To fully comprehend the idea fully, geographers have had to research Thomas Malthus studies. Malthus was a British scholar whom played a key role in demography, the study of population. Malthus contributed to the fields of human geographers. While studying different animal species, Malthus noticed that populations grew…

    • 566 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    set out. The situation of the labourer being then again tolerably comfortable, the restraints to population are in some degree loosened, and the same retrograde and progressive movements with respect to happiness are repeated."[citation needed] Malthus also saw that societies through history had experienced at one time or another epidemics, famines, or wars: events that masked the fundamental problem of populations overstretching their resource limitations: "The power of population is so superior…

    • 410 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    scale as Thomas Malthus. In “An Essay on the Principle of Population”, published in 1798, the English economist made public his theory on population dynamics and its relationship with the availability of resources. The essay was the result of his skepticism towards positivist theorists, praising the perfectibility of man and greeting the advances and diffusion of human knowledge as a source of welfare and freedom for future generations. Disagreeing with such perspectives, Malthus maintained…

    • 984 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Thomas Robert Malthus was a British economist, whose famous Theory of Population highlighted the potential dangers of overpopulation. In his famous An Essay on the Principles of Population, Malthus shows as that: 'the populations of the world would increase in geometric proportions the food resources available for them would increase only in arithmetic proportions'. In simple words, human population can increase at a faster rate than the food supply. Agriculture has diminishing returns. Therefore…

    • 834 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Legacies

    • 378 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Legacies and Differences of Cultural Change There were many Legacies that are still in existence today, because the early encounters with Native Americans and Africans, this civilization is still in existence. The encounters caused the Native Americans to adopt and integrate their traditions, cultures and societies and tribes of cultures and were integrated with the way of life of many cultures. Architecture, food and music were all resonates of legacies from the early encounters. The legacies…

    • 378 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Legacy

    • 526 Words
    • 1 Page

    Cydney Biergans Senior English Period 6 10/6/2014 A legacy is something handed down from those before us something a person leaves behind. Most of the time, we think of a legacy as money or possessions left behind. " The greatest legacy one can pass on to one's children and grandchildren is not money or other material things accumulated in one's life, but rather a legacy of character and faith ." (Billy Graham) I interpret this quotation to mean that if I want those around me to learn to treat the people around them differently…

    • 526 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays