The Language of Poetry

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Topics: Poetry
The Language of Poetry
This accessible satellite textbook in the Routledge INTERTEXT series is unique in offering students hands-on practical experience of textual analysis focused on poetry.
Written in a clear, user-friendly style by an experienced writer and practising teacher, it links practical activities with examples of texts. These are followed by commentaries and suggestions for research. It can be used individually or in conjunction with the series core textbook, Working with Texts: A core book for language analysis.
Aimed at A-Level and beginning undergraduate students, The Language of Poetry: focuses on the ‘look, the sound, the movement and the appeal of poetry uses clusters of poems to highlight differences in structure, tone, quality and form explores historical, contemporary, regional and social differences in language and style combines a highly individual and fascinating selection of poems from the canonical to the fringe, among them an Old English lament, a haiku and a poem by Benjamin
Zephaniah
includes a selection of suggestions for project work has a comprehensive glossary of terms
John McRae is Special Professor of Language in Literature Studies at the University of
Nottingham. He has been at the forefront of work on the language and literature interface for many years and is the co-author of The Routledge History of Literature in English.

The Intertext series
Why does the phrase ‘spinning a yarn’ refer both to using language and making cloth? What might a piece of literary writing have in common with an advert or a note from the milkman?
What aspects of language are important to understand when analysing texts?
The Routledge INTERTEXT series will develop readers’ understanding of how texts work. It does this by showing some of the designs and patterns in the language from which they are made, by placing texts within the contexts in which they occur, and by exploring relationships between them.
The series

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