The Importance Of Informed Consent

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You made some great points in this week’s discussion post. How the student introduced herself in this case is very important. Although she may be a registered nurse, she is a student when it comes to anesthesia. “Informed consent involves two separate components: The person must be fully informed so that he or she can make an informed choice, and the consent must be voluntary” (Guido, 2014, p. 148). The patient suing the hospital wasn’t fully informed in this case. He thought a licensed professional would be completing his surgery and that most definitely wasn’t the case. For this reason I completely agree with you and think that this case should be awarded to the patient.

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