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The Importance Of Criminal Justice: The Ten Constitutional Amendments

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The Importance Of Criminal Justice: The Ten Constitutional Amendments
When it comes to the Bill of Rights it contains a total of ten constitutional amendments. The most relevant to criminal justice are the fourth, fifth, sixth, and eighth amendments. The Fourth Amendment is one of the most well known. This amendment states that, people have the right to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against any unreasonable search and seizures. Their right shall not be violated, and warrants are issued when there is a probable cause. This amendment gives people the right to be free from any unreasonable search and seizures. When it comes to a warrant there is specific requirements that guide the warrant process. The warrant has to be issued by a judged, and supported by a probable cause, and specific details on …show more content…
This amendment states that, "excessive bail shall not be required, nor excesive fines imposed, nor cruel and unsual punishments inflicted" ( Siegel & Schmalleger & Worrall, 2015 P.14). By keeping bails to a reasonable amount, it ensures that individuals that are not considered dangerous, won't be languish in jail cells, till court date. With nor cruel and unsual punishments, it ensures that no tortures, beatings, or horrific executions take place. Finally, is the Fourteenth Amendment, which is due process. This amendment states that, no states shall enforce any law that shall abrigde the privaleges of the United States citizens. That means they shall not deprive any persons life, liberty, or property, without the due process law. When it comes to the amendments relationship to out Constitutional Rights, they help ensure those that are accused of any criminal activity are not rushed to judgement and treated unfairly. However, the Constitutional Rights protect everyone in this country. "The U.S Constitution spells out the rights we all enjoy, and these rights are not boundary specific; they apply throughout the United States" ( Siegel & Schmalleger & Worrall, 2015

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