"The Healer" Analysis

Good Essays
Analysis Paper on "The Healer" Many fairytales of the past convey themes of a traditional nature- good versus evil, love lost, and love found. While these older tales are often interesting and relatable, the fairytales of today have begun to create new themes and convey more contemporary schools of thought. The author Amiee Bender displays this latter change in storytelling in the short story, “The Healer.” This story tells of the challenges of being unique and average, degree of emotion, and using one’s talents and gifts. In “The Healer,” the challenges of being unique are obviously addressed; however, the hardships of being average are also throughout the story. The fire girl and the ice girl obviously have the problems of ‘fitting in’ with the other people and students in the school. The author portrays the fire girl as having a desire to fit in with others and have connections with people; unfortunately, due to her uniqueness of her fiery hand, the other students are wary of connecting and forming friendships with her and appear to only want to use her when convenient and socially acceptable, such as when they need to have their cigarettes lit. The fire girl appears to know this and seeks connections in other ways such as burning items, even though she feels very alone. The ice girl is quite opposite, not desiring to fit in; perhaps she has accepted her fate as a social outcast or perhaps she feels no pain when being alone. The average girl also displays the hardship of being average as she desires to be more than mediocre and have something that sets her out from the crowd, such as the hands of the ice girl and fire girl. She appears interested in their gifts and obviously desires a uniqueness of her own displayed in her daydreaming and thoughts of grandeur.
The peril of degree of emotion is also a theme of this story. The fire girl represents feeling to much, while the ice girl represents feeling too little. The fire girl has strong desires

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    The common fairytale portrays the stereotypical “damsel in distress,” who is helpless until her male savior typically rescues her. Many fairytales address the theme of gender roles as well as many others. The female character takes on the feeble, desolate role, while the male character takes on the strong, hero role similar to the stories of Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty. However, Elizabeth, the protagonist of The Paper Bag Princess defies typical gender roles as a female character and becomes the hero of the story. Cinderella and The Paper Bag Princess share many qualities, but have major differences as well. Cinderella is an example of a woman who occupies traditional, domestic roles, but she does not portray the modern, liberated woman Elizabeth exhibits.…

    • 1829 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Snow White Analysis

    • 1103 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Fairy tales are often significant for enhancing imagination and different perspectives in the readers. Fairy tales are symbolic in our history and may currently still be present in our society. Fairy Tales also allow us to analyze the emotion of the characters and compare that to our culture as well as our own daily life. In “Snow White and her Wicked Stepmother” and the classic “Snow White” by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm both focus intently on how envy, competition, hard-work, and mother daughter relationships and how that is still applied in our world today. The classic “Snow White” allows the reader to focus specifically on how the dwarves are emblematic toward the American dream and toward the common working man…

    • 1103 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Fairytales. When we hear or see that calming word, we automatically think of beautiful expensive ball gowns, charming handsome Princes, pumpkins turning into carriages, and the infamous ending of true loves first kiss. When growing up, many of us had these wonderful tales read to us before bed or at school with all of our friends. Fairytales, having been around for centuries, sends all kinds of important moral messages from being a child to facing the ‘beautiful’ world of adulthood. Growing up and being placed in the adult world, we come to terms that fairytales aren’t the classic stories of Little Red Riding Hood, Briar Rose, or Cinderella that we all know and love, its much more than that. We are surrounded by Fairytales, almost as if they…

    • 1583 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Imagine having a love so strong that even angels in heaven are envious. This is how a man felt about his beloved Annabel Lee. They fell deeply in love at a very young age. This great love had complications when Annabel was abruptly taken away from the man and eventually passing away. She his darling, his wife, and his bride and now she was gone. They say true love conquers that the love they shared is eternal, and regardless of her death, their love will last forever. This poem was described with many elements that help illustrate a tragic fairy tale love story. Imagery, word choice, and alliteration are all poetic elements that helped shaped this poem.…

    • 488 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Fairytales: when someone says that word, the first thing that might come up in your mind is probably kid’s reading Cinderella. Fairytales’ simplicity and accuracy in delivering a moral to young kids and adults is wonderful. We’d give an adult a eerie look if we caught them reading a kids book on the train to themselves. The reason behind our thought is cause it’s a kids book why would an adult read it but behind all this is the difference of interpreting stories for adults and children. Stories like Juniper Tree, Snow White, and Little Red Cap include hidden messages through violence and imagery and dialogue. Fairy tales teach children how to grasp the meaning and power behind storytelling. In this paper I will discuss the vast ways in which a child and adult interpret fairytales. Its…

    • 1983 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Shall We Dance

    • 1166 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Many of us feel hopelessness and despair and wish for a better life, and so does Cinderella. The magic of the Cinderella story, filled with a magical god-mother or a magical tree with birds, allows us to imagine that hope is just a wave of a wand, or a planting of a tree, or even perhaps magical singing birds. In fact, magic is told in every fairy tale interpretation of Cinderella.…

    • 1166 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Fairy tales are part of every Western child 's upbringing, and have been for decades. The method of telling and the stories them selves may have changed from the purely oral tradition to that of the written word with the introduction of the printing press and more importantly the Chap Book in the eighteenth century (Montgomery, 2009 p. 13). But the basic core of the tales remain hundreds of years on to instruct and delight children to this day. These days children are surrounded by fairy tales in the form of the books read to them at home or nursery/school, television and film adaptations, cartoons and even advertisements, as well as Christmas pantomimes. Each version they see will have differences, some more subtle than others, but the basic story will be the same.…

    • 2178 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Fitcher's Bird

    • 1149 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The fairytale’s plotline follows the basic structural framework of a fairytale with a female protagonist and is a story about deliverance or salvation. The protagonist, who is the youngest of 3 daughters, is set apart from her 2 elder sisters by her cleverness. Like many stories with female protagonists, there is originally…

    • 1149 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Cinderella In The Odyssey

    • 1270 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Everyone knows and loves the fairytale “Cinderella” where Cinderella starts out as a maid, wearing nothing but rags, and doing nothing but chores. She desires to go to this ball, but her nasty stepmother sends her to work right away, without allowing her to go. Fortunately for Cinderella, her fairy Godmother transforms her into a beautiful princess and lets her go to the ball, where she meets the price of her dreams. He is astonished by her beauty and in the end of the fairytale they fall in love. Everyone is fascinated by Cinderella’s story but one may not realize who is truly the reason for Cinderella’s good fortune. Without the help of her fairy godmother ensuring that everything worked out for Cinderella in the end, she never would have…

    • 1270 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    For many generations, the fairy tales, loved by many, have been passed down from relatives and friends, being shared and retold by one individual to the next. Growing and evolving as the years go by, these stories live on through readers’ lives. The deep connection between the timeless tales and the lives of people accentuates its need to exist in society. These fairy tales mold and shape people’s own stories and are a reflection of what individuals experience and encounter. During times when one feels lost and disoriented, fairy tales are a tool of navigation; they unveil a path and guide one down it. Not only do these tales provide insight to oneself, they impart an educational source to children and individuals in society. They spark and…

    • 1320 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Cinderella adheres to her mother’s advice to “be devout” and to “be good” (Sexton 1), submissively enduring such condemnatory insults as being the perpetual maid for the household and accepting a mere twig of a tree from her father rather than receiving the jewels and gowns bestowed to her stepsisters. Instead of attempting to change her wretched condition, she internalizes her feelings, a stereotypical characteristic that commonly plagues the female character in fairy tales. In stark contrast, the prince is willing to alter his status from bachelor to married by holding the ball, magnifying the male dominant character of fairy tales. Cinderella’s change of luck depends completely on the prince’s ball, without which she would have remained the same cinder-covered maiden. In addition, the prince embodies a redeeming character who chases after shy Cinderella and uplifts her from her tragic condition, almost as if he was a replacement for the dove in satisfying Cinderella’s desires. These stereotypes, together with the “happily ever…

    • 2042 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Cinderella -Analysis

    • 1058 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Cinderella’s story is undoubtedly the most popular fairy tale all over the world. Her fairy tale is one of the best read and emotion filled story that we all enjoyed as young and adults. In Elizabeth Pantajja’s analysis, Cinderella’s story still continues to evoke emotions but not as a love story but a contradiction of what we some of us believe. Pantajja chose Cinderella’s story to enlighten the readers that being good and piety are not the reason for Cinderella’s envious fairy tale. The author’s criticism and forthright analysis through her use of pathos, ethos, and logos made the readers doubt Cinderella’s character and question the real reason behind her marrying the prince. Pantajja claims that Cinderella isn’t really motherless and helpless as the old fairy tale wanted the readers to believe. Her mother played a vital role in her success in rising to a position of power and influence. (Pantajja, 1993, p. 644)…

    • 1058 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    In the world of scholarly fairy tale analysis, Maria Tatar is a prominent figure. Tatar is strongly opinionated regarding these tales and believe that the meaning of them is often misrepresented- fairy tale’s do not teach objective morals and values to children, but rather provide a platform to express the contrast of anxieties and desires to further succeed through life’s struggle. Using Tatar’s claim regarding desires and anxieties as an analysis tool to help understand complicated variants of the world’s favorite fairy tales is a rewarding and and educational process. Delving into a story that most assume they already “know” in a conceptually different way expands the mind and makes prominent issues that may not already be clear just…

    • 1797 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Fairy tales are probably the most important and constant part of our society. The stories are embedded deep within us since childhood, and are relived constantly throughout adulthood. What they represent haunts us, and their meanings are as obvious as the mundane paths of lives we all go through. Whereas children seem to be lacking full understanding of them, adults are no strangers to the world of fairy tales. As C. S. Lewis once said, “Some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.”…

    • 975 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Maria Tatar’s introduction to The Classic Fairy Tales explains the impact of fairy tales on human life. Tatar is an author whose work mostly consists of fairy tale comparisons and anthologies. She is also a professor at Harvard University, where she teaches courses on folklore and children’s literature among other things (1). Maria Tatar’s prior knowledge of the fairy tale genre helped provide a strong basis for the insight included in the introduction. Although in certain sections it could be seen as bias. Overall her work and comparisons to others helped the reader observe the significance of fairy tales in society. Fairy Tales are an important facet in the psychological development of youth worldwide.…

    • 946 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays