The Harlem Renaissance

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THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE: IT'S HISTORICAL IMPORTANCE ON BLACK CULTURE AND SOCIETY IN AMERICA
Written by *

Dr. William Mulligan History 522 Fall 1999

OUTLINE

I. INTRODUCTION

II. RACIAL CLIMATE AFTER WORLD WAR I

III. POLITICAL LEADERS EMERGING IN HARLEM

IV. HARLEM AS THE "BLACK METROPOLIS"

V. THE ARTS OF HARLEM

VI. WHITE AMERICA'S ROLE IN THE RENAISSANCE

VII. REFLECTIONS ON THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE'S HISTORICAL IMPORTANCE

1.

The Harlem Renaissance is one of the most influential movements in a minority group's history in the United States of America. The renaissance sparked an awareness of self for Black Americans in the early part of the twentieth century. It was the bringing together of black artists, politicians, musicians, writers, poets, dancers and blacks from all over the country concentrated in Harlem, New York. Harlem became the home of anybody who had dreams of being heard or expressing great talents. It also became the center for radical as well as rational thoughts on the improvement of the condition of Black Americans in society during the late 1900's on up to the 1920's.

The Harlem Renaissance as an historical movement is seldom taught as a major point in United States history. Due to

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