The Hanover Revolt: Insurrection by Slaves in 1776

Powerful Essays
The Hanover Revolt of 1776
AP-HIST 1050
Dave Cousins
November 21, 2012

The Hanover Revolt of 1776

Two documents which discuss the slave revolt in seventeen seventy-six are titled as “The Jamaican Slave Insurrection” by Richard Sheridan and “Testing the Chains” by Michael Craton. Both these documents contain these historian’s perspectives about the seventeen seventy-six slave revolt. These documents both have similarities and differences and contribute aspects with the seventeen seventy-six slave revolt. Sheridan’s document is very detailed discussing the life of the maroons from before and after they signed the treaty. Sheridan’s document also discusses the events that occurred before the slave revolt, what caused the slave revolt, American Revolution, and the plot of the slaves. Sheridan’s document goes into depth and presents many details on what he is trying to say. On the other hand, Craton’s document only discusses one major event which was about the plot of the slaves. With no evidential proof on what caused the slave revolt, these historian’s share with us there perspectives and gives us an idea on what some of the answers to our questions might be.

Before the slave revolt occurred in seventeen seventy-six, there were many other slave outbursts that occurred in the past. It was stated in Sheridan’s document that after years of getting ambushed and attacked, the whites sued the Maroons for peace. The Maroons and the whites eventually signed the first treaty which occurred on March seventeen thirty-nine. The rebellions began to get very frustrated with the maroons do to the fact that there have been no plans of attack since the treaty was signed. Although, in seventeen sixty, slaves from numerous plantations in the parish of St. Mary fought back. This attack was successful due to the fact that the slaves broke in a fort and acquired arms and gunpowder. This led to the action of the slaves going from plantation to plantation

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Demerara Slave Revolt

    • 2061 Words
    • 9 Pages

    The Demerara Slave Revolt The 1823 slave revolt in Demarara, Guyana, started on a sugar plantation called “Plantation Success”- on the east coast of the colony on August 23. It spread throughout the nearby area to involve slaves from at least fifty-five plantations. In total, around ten thousand of the approximately seventy-five thousand slaves who lived in the colony rose in violent rebellion against their oppressors. The revolt would have been even larger, however, had the slaves succeeded in…

    • 2061 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    This triumph followed the long and violent Haitian slave revolution in which Haiti, specifically the island of Saint Dominique suffered from. After the enlightenment the Rights of Man act provided equality among all Frenchmen, including blacks and mulattos. Fury rose in the plantation owners and they eventually got the act retracted in 1791. In reply, the Haitian slaves originally from Africa revolted. During the rebellion, "the Haitian slaves burned every plantation throughout the fertile regions…

    • 1040 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The slave revolt failed because the gladiators of Spartacus would not leave Italy and move north, as Spartacus wanted they were outnumbered but won several battles. Eventually Spartacus moved his group south towards Sicily, but after several attempts by Crassus, Spartacus and his gladiators were defeated and killed at Brundisium.…

    • 50 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Toussaint L’Ouverture, a Haitian born slave, was the remarkable leader who organized and led the slave revolt of 1791. As a literate and educated man, he often busied himself with reading the works of French Enlightenment philosophers, who preached individual rights and equality among men. In 1789 the French Revolutionaries (who advocated liberty, fraternity and equality) exempted the slaves from the “Rights of Man”; leaving them feeling betrayed thus fueling the fire of rebellion. Toussaint’s…

    • 670 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Philippine Insurrection

    • 828 Words
    • 4 Pages

    heart of the Filipino people. One night at a party, two soldiers disguised as Filipino soldiers, surprised and captured Emilio Aguinaldo. Filipinos were willing to surrender the war in exchange for Emilio Aguinaldo, thus ending the Philippine Insurrection. The only way for America to effectively fight against the guerrilla warfare used by the Filipinos was to destroy their villages to cut off supplies from the guerillas. Because of the Filipino lack of leadership and supplies, the war was virtually…

    • 828 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    African American Women, Slave Revolts, and Historical Constructions of Racialized Gender” is an attempt by Rebecca Hall, to uncover women’s participation in slave revolts and to address a concern of why enslaved women were silenced in revolt. She also focuses on why certain aspects of slave revolt are seen as exclusively male activities. To accomplish her task, she uses a number of book excerpts from prominent historians, as well as many sources from accounts of slave revolts in history. Although Hall…

    • 2152 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Revolts seemed to be relatively common wherever slavery occurs, be it Ancient Rome, Russia, Haiti, or the United States of America. Slaves, assumedly, had their own reasons to believe that their revolts would be successful whether it was a belief in God's protection, a feeling of strength in numbers, or a general sentiment of being dead would be better than living in slavery, but few had a reason as good as those after the successful slave rebellion that occurred in Haiti. This rebellion led by Toussaint…

    • 1129 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    1776

    • 417 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Hannah Medeiros Honors History Mr. Chew 2/14/15 1776 Book Review 1776 is a book by historian David McCullough, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and national bestseller, based on the American Revolution against the British. The book moves through countless different battles between the Americans and the British, involving fascinating facts of the war and the people immensely involved such as Nathanael Green, Henry Knox, and multifarious others. McCullough talks about the paltry and considerable…

    • 417 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    1776

    • 324 Words
    • 1 Page

    1776 (released in the United Kingdom as 1776: America and Britain At War)[1] is a book written by David McCullough, first published by Simon & Schuster on May 24, 2005. The work is considered a companion piece to McCullough's earlier biography of John Adams, and focuses on the events surrounding the start of the American Revolution. While revolving mostly around the leadership (and often indecisiveness) of George Washington, there is also considerable attention given to King George III, General Howe…

    • 324 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    1776

    • 1087 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Robert Jones Mr. Thompson American History October 4, 2014 1776 by David Maccullough Throughout the 18th century, tensions had been steadily increasing between Great Britain and the American colonies. The colonists were only upset because of the taxes and restrictions Parliament constantly bombarded them with, and King George III knew this. After the French and Indian War ended in 1763 with the Treaty of Paris, Britain now owned a vast majority of the north American continent. With the threat of…

    • 1087 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays