The Greek Ideas Of Beauty

Satisfactory Essays
A human, animal, landscape, painting, sculpture, sound, and even a feeling can all be beautiful. The Egyptians viewed beauty from many diverse foundations. This includes symbolic, sculptures in the round and various documents. Most of it supports a specific type of beauty, especially in individuals and maybe even more specifically in females. Egyptians mostly used words to express beauty. For example, "n" and "nfr" were two adjectives that were used to describe beautiful things, or beautiful people. “nfr”, which is nefer in modern Egyptological works, was one of the most popular, and is still used in names. The verbs came from nfr include snfr, which means beautifully or beautified. nfrw or nfr, and later bw nfr, may also be used as an abstract idea of beauty. …show more content…
The Greek word - kaloskagathos - meant being gorgeous to look at, and hence being a good person. This would only refer to the men. A completely different event happens to women. The Greeks described women as kalon kakon or “the beautiful-evil thing”. Women were beautiful because they were evil, and evil because they were beautiful. This is the reverse in Egyptian thinking where women were seen as purely beautiful because beauty was a gift from the gods. Art historian Heinrich Wölfflin says the classical conception of beauty is that of perfect proportion. The classical beginning shows that beauty has various elaborate yet symbolic parts that all come together to equal a whole. This thought relies on harmony, symmetry, and similar concepts which is a primitive Western conception of beauty. It is also embodied in classical and neo-classical architecture, sculpture, literature, and music wherever they

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The Art of Ancient Greece

    • 5228 Words
    • 21 Pages

    The ancient Greeks are known as a self aware people. No other culture in western civilization history was quite as introspective as the Greeks. They prided themselves as the most civilized society in the world. In fact the term “barbarian” basically meant non Greek. The development of Greek civilization rises from the ashes of the ancient Mycenaean and Minion cultures. From After the decline and eventual fall of the Mycenaean culture in 1100 BCE, the Aegean Islands would experience a “dark age” period for about 200 – 300 years. By 800 BCE Greece would begin to show growth and stability in their government, economy and culture. This period is referred to as the Homeric Age. The writer Homer would write the stories of prehistoric Greek history (If you have not had to read The Iliad or The Odyssey in your academic career thus far, just wait, it is coming.) It is the Greek culture that would be the basis for western cultures for art, architecture, music, theater, philosophy, literature and politics.…

    • 5228 Words
    • 21 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The treatment and stigma towards women is constantly evolving. It varies from country to country, and it changing even today. As war driven cultures started to take over, freedom and respect for women decreased in ancient societies. Their freedom, rights, and societal status were ever changing in history. For this paper, the focus will be on the Ancient Minoa, Classical Athens, and the Roman Empire.…

    • 738 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Greek Art Analyses

    • 636 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Archaic Greek period was between the 8th and 6th centuries B.C.E., when what would later be leading characteristics of Greek art can be seen in their earliest form. Most sculptors of human beings we see that the body’s and faces are fairly abstract; as time evolved so did the tradition, sculptors aimed increasingly at giving their statues a lifelike, considerable presence. They observed human bodies more attentively and copied them more faithfully, leading eventually to a style we know as naturalism. The main reason for this was because most of their statues were of their gods. The more believable the statue was the more present to believers the deity seemed. Ever sanctuary had a god or goddess in it. On such statue is Kroisos 530 BC Archaic Period Marble 6'4 grave in Anavysos kouros statue much more naturalistic than in other periods the rounded cheeks and hips natural and hair. Was originally painted (eyes, lips etc.), but Greeks normally left the flesh the color of the stone. The man Kroisos died in war. The statue base says that Ares (God of war) destroyed him whilst he was in war-stands in the typical Egyptian stance (one foot forward).…

    • 636 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Humanism In Greek Art

    • 644 Words
    • 3 Pages

    When identifying and articulating ethics, one may conclude that the best way to express one’s values is through speech or literature, bluntly stating what they believe. However, this is simply untrue, for there are limitless theories, and a multitude of ways to express them. The Greeks, for example, exhibited their values in multiple ways. The Greeks were undoubtedly humanists, displaying their humanistic values through government, art and architecture, and philosophy.…

    • 644 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ancient Greek Culture

    • 1522 Words
    • 7 Pages

    There are so many ways in which history has been documented over time all serving as a permanent record of a culture and its people for future generations to have access to and learn from. The study of the visual arts and architecture in a given time period showcase the basic ideas about a group of human beings giving insight into their beliefs and cultural message. These insights are presented with a specific point of view intended by its creator, influenced by its historical experiences. And so, it is the responsibility of the observer to examine pieces of art and architectural structures taking into account the context in which they were produced. By doing so, we can more accurately understand the ideas that are trying to be conveyed. Political,…

    • 1522 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Keuls, Eva C. The Reign of the Phallus: Sexual Politics in Ancient Athens. Berkeley: University of California, 1993. Print.…

    • 2096 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Essay On Greek Culture

    • 548 Words
    • 3 Pages

    There are many greek influences on our culture today. However, these impacts are not very widely known in our modern society. The Greek culture affects our everyday way of life. They created democracy, the alphabet, libraries, the Olympics, math, science, architecture, and even lighthouses. Greecians created systems that would not be imagined in a person’s wildest dreams. They created things WELL that were way before their time. For example, democracy. If that is not an impact Greece has made on our culture, then I don’t know what is. This political system started in Athens, where it started as a Monarch, then grew to an oligarchy, until it finally reached a democracy. The government consisted of an assembly of 6,000 members that were all adult male citezens. The assembly voted on issues throughout Athens and passed laws. Our democracy in America is similar to this. Though the Greek democracy was not as polished and fair, it was still influencial to modern cultures. Something used every day, all over the world, not just in western civilization, is the alphabet. The Greeks were the first civilization to use the alphabet, and it’s usefullness spread throughout the globe. Today,…

    • 548 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Greeks have a long and lustrous history. The saying "we are all Greeks" by British poet Percy Bysshe Shellsy sums it all up and the influence of that perfection lives on today. The saying actually means that we are all influenced by the culture of the Greek people and the perfection that they strived for.…

    • 863 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    It is hard to think of the ancient world without looking at the Greek and Roman empires. Although similar, the Greek and Roman empires are two different cultures. They existed from 500 B.C.E. to 500 C.E. (Fiero, 2006). One constant in both cultures was their pursuit of perfection in their art and architecture. This paper will examine this pursuit of perfection in both cultures and how their impact is felt in the modern age.…

    • 1241 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Women in classical athens

    • 1147 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Being a woman in classical Athens cannot have been much fun, if one can rely on the majority of the accounts of women's position in the Greek city-state. The Athenian democracy, traditionally held in high esteem in many other ways, was a democracy of the minority. Women, foreigners and slaves had no influence or true civil rights. They lived in the shadow of the Parthenon and the Acropolis.…

    • 1147 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    There is a fine line drawn between superiority and suppressiveness. Although, together the adjectives are terrifying, these words describe a man who for decades hid his misconduct towards women. This is just one of many stories that has publicly unfolded and revealed the hideous truth behind a man with power in the film industry. Since the article written by Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, published in The New York Times, actresses and models have come forward; sharing their own horrific encounters with Harvey Weinstein. Their experiences have highlighted the importance of confronting men who take advantage of their power and manipulate people to keep them quiet. It is injustice for anyone to use their superiority to intentionally hurt others…

    • 202 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Greek Classicism

    • 643 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Ancient Greeks Classicism arts were set on six main characteristics. Those characteristics being order, idealized figures, realism, simplicity, balance, and clarity. All art forms this time period display each of theses. Even in other parts of the world you can also see Greek characteristics in art due to Alexander conquering much of the area and bringing Greek influence. I am going to be focusing on one artifact in particular. That being Myron's Discus Thrower also known as Discobolus (p, 88; Fig. 3.11).…

    • 643 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Women in Ancient Greece

    • 1176 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Women's role in Greece can be seen when one first begins to do research on the subject. The subject of women in Greece is coupled with the subject of slaves. This is the earliest classification of women in Greek society. Although women were treated differently from city to city the basic premise of that treatment never changed. Women were only useful for establishing a bloodline that could carry on the family name and give the proper last rites to the husband. However, women did form life long bonds with their husbands and found love in arranged marriages. Women in Athenian Society Women are "defined as near slaves, or as perpetual minors" in Athenian society (The Greek World, pg. 200). For women life didn't extend far from the home, which was thought to be their sole realm of existence. Though they ranked higher than slaves did, they were treated in many of the same ways. Just like slaves, their mothers trained women as adolescents what their domestic duties were. They were secluded from all males, including those in their family. They lived in gynaikeion, which were women's apartments in Athens (Daily Life in Greece, pg. 55). They were kept at home where they were taught the proper manners and duties of a desirable wife. "Marriage was the inevitable goal to which her whole life tended. To remain a spinster was the worst disgrace which could befall a woman" (Everyday Life in Ancient Greece, pg. 82). However, it was seen as more of a disgrace on her father who ‘owned' her until she was married. Although Athenian women were completely in charge of their household and slaves, they didn't have much freedom. They rarely left the house, unless they were part of some sort of religious procession. They could only walk abroad in the streets if accompanied by a slave or other attendant. It was improper for respectable women to share the same social entertainments as men. Even if caught in the courtyard of the house by a male visitor, they would…

    • 1176 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Greek Culture

    • 965 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Greek culture is a culture that I know little to nothing about. In the Greek culture, family is very important. In their culture it is very important to have a good, trusting relationship with their doctor. Typically a male would see a male doctor and a woman would see a female doctor. In most cases, Greek families like to know of an illness of someone in the family before the ill family member finds out. The family members would like to decide if the diagnosis is worth telling the sick family member. Greeks are very sensitive on death and dying issues so they prefer not to tell a family member because they feel it would only be a burden. (Mitchell) After a death they light a candle that will burn all night. Once buried bones, after 3 years, are unburied and put into a holy box to be placed in church or reburied in the family grave. Graves are visited daily in this culture as they celebrate a special service on the 40th day after a death.…

    • 965 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Stereotypes in America

    • 397 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Everyone has their own opinions on what beauty consists of. It is in cliché expression “beauty is in the eye of the beholder.” This means beauty can come from within a person’s soul or from the outside of looking at woman’s body. As it just happened, saying the word “beauty” on most occasions comes hand in hand with the word woman. In the story “A Woman’s Beauty: Put – Down or Power Source” by Susan Sontag. Sontag states; “To be called beautiful is thought to name something essential to women’s character and concerns. (In contrast to men whose essence is to be strong or effective, or competent.)” (Sontag.488.1) The word beautiful may not seem synonymous with men in 2015 but handsome is, as the word “handsome” feels more masculine.…

    • 397 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays