The Great Irish Famine

Good Essays
. Potato crops were the best option for Irish people because potatoes provide lots of nutrients and the crops were easy to grow in Irish lands due to their adaptability in almost any surface.
However, the dependency on potatoes started to be dangerous when a new potato disease commonly known as potato blight affected the crops year after year in the 1840’s. This disease caused the loss of great part of the crops until the end of the decade, but especially in the year 1847, called the black forty-seven because it affected more than 90% of the crops. The potato blight came from America in a shipment of seed potatoes for European farmers. Irish farmers, who landed almost only one type of vegetable, a potato called the Irish Lumper, were the most affected ones by this disease as they did not have anything else to land and most of the crops fell because this new disease. However, Ireland wasn’t the only affected country but it was the most affected one indeed.
In 1845 the Irish expected a great potato harvest but instead, 50%of the crops were lost. The year after, the problem got worse and 1847 was the worst year of this 3 year period as almost all the potatoes were lost. At first, the British Empire did not do anything to solve the problem as they thought it was a common potato famine, but in 1846, when they realized it was not, Sir Robert Peel imported £100,000 worth of corn. The corn was welcomed in Ireland despite this measurement not being enough to stop hunger, as more than £300,000 worth of potatoes were lost. After this, the government tried to help by providing public work and creating employment for people to earn some money. They also provided emergency fever hospitals to deal with diseases.
However, some people thought that the Irish were not worth the effort and that they had what they deserved. Moreover, if they did not know how to survive to the famine they had better die for common well being. The majority of the landlords were British, and supported

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    The Great Irish Famine

    • 3122 Words
    • 9 Pages

    essay will investigate the response of the British Government during the great famine of Ireland between 1845 and 1852. It will look at the political ideology that inspired the public relief works and how they failed to offer relief from starvation, but instead focused on bringing about social change inspired by largely an anti-Irish sentiment. It will also examine the role of the soup kitchen’s that were set up to attack famine conditions directly and how this represented and exposed the Governments…

    • 3122 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    irish potato famine

    • 341 Words
    • 2 Pages

    low genetic variation are more vulnerable to changing environmental conditions than are diverse populations. The Irish potato clones were certainly low on genetic variation, so when the environment changed and a potato disease swept through the country in the 1840s, the potatoes (and the people who depended upon them) were devastated.Thesis: The Irish Potato Famine devastated the Irish population and economy as well as sowing the seeds of rebellion against England. 1st Point: Ireland dependent…

    • 341 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Irish Potato Famine

    • 34000 Words
    • 136 Pages

    The Great Irish Famine Ireland 1847 Approved by the New Jersey Commission on Holocaust Education on September 10th, 1996, for inclusion in the Holocaust and Genocide Curriculum at the secondary level. Revision submitted 11/26/98. 0. DEDICATION AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This curriculum is dedicated to the millions of Irish who suffered and perished in the Great Starvation. It is also dedicated to those who escaped by emigration, and to the great Irish Diaspora worldwide. The Irish Famine…

    • 34000 Words
    • 136 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Irish Potato Famine

    • 2993 Words
    • 12 Pages

    THE IRISH POTATO FAMINE Pre-Famine History The potato was introduced to Europe sometime in the 16th century. There are many theories on how it arrived, but the one with the most credibility is from a case study done by Theresa Purcell. She explains how the white potato, also known as the Irish potato, originated in the Andean Mountains and was brought to Europe by the Spaniards. The potato was originally classified in the same family as the poisonous nightshade so people refrained from eating…

    • 2993 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Irish Potato Famine

    • 1649 Words
    • 7 Pages

    In the early 1800s life in Ireland wasn't easy, Irish citizens got by day to day by farming and relying on the potato. The potato was their main source of food and money. With out the potato the Irish would have nothing. No one was prepared for what was about to happen in 1845, the beginning of the Great Irish Potato Famine. The Irish Potato Famine was the worst tragedy in the history of Ireland. The outcome of the famine would result in hundreds of thousands dead, an failure of the economy…

    • 1649 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Irish Potato Famine

    • 1407 Words
    • 6 Pages

    I A. The autumn of 1856 was a time of great starvation for Ireland. B. Many people were affected by the Potato Famine because the potato was their staple crop. C. The population during the famine dropped from 8.1 million to 6.8 million. D. Why was the famine so severe even though it was during the modern age? Thesis: The impact of the Irish Potato Famine would not have been as devastating if England hadn’t controlled Ireland by foreclosing thriving industries, passing…

    • 1407 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Irish Potoatoe Famine

    • 1300 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The Irish Potato Famine Six long years, with over 1 million dead, and nearly a quarter of the population missing, the Irish Potato Famine left a massive imprint in history (Irish 1). Most people underestimate the destruction of the Potato Famine because 1 million does not look like very many in today's population numbers. Back in the 1800's, less than 8 million populated Ireland. With their largest food source destroyed, the Irish looked upon Britain for help, in…

    • 1300 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Great Famine

    • 1620 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Views The Great Famine of 1845 -1849 was a trying time for many, specifically the Irish, British, and immigrants to Canada. These three groups, although in the middle of the same problem, held very different sometimes opposing views. To fully understand why there were various views one must take into account the social, cultural, economic, and governmental situations of each group. For the British, the problem was whether or not to take action, and if so how and when. In the Irish-men 's eyes,…

    • 1620 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    mid-19th century, a famine hit Ireland that forced many Irish to leave their homes and emigrate to America in hopes of rebuilding their lives and rising out of their impoverished and starving state. Many Irish emigrated to the eastern part of the United States, specifically to New York. The Irish immigrants did not have an easy life in New York because of anti - Irish sentiment and their inability to assimilate into American culture. The most common place in New York where the Irish lived was an area…

    • 1685 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Irish Potato Famine Essay

    • 507 Words
    • 3 Pages

    this day. The movement of the resettlement is central to canadian history, from aboriginal people, whose ancestors. The history of immigration to Canada extends back thousands of years. The three topics of the waves are, The Irish potato famine in 1820-1850. It was the Great Hunger was a period of mass starvation, The causes upon what happen there was a disease going around and it got around the colony. The second incident was the europeans in 1860-1920. It was when the europeans were trying to immigrate…

    • 507 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays