Preview

The Great Gatsby Motifs

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
657 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
The Great Gatsby Motifs
In Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, we follow a “commoner” around in a very rich environment. We witness the absurd and strange events that occur in East and West Egg, Valley of Ashes, and New York. Fitzgerald’s use of reoccurring motifs shows readers the characteristics of public and private parties. This motif ties all the events together, leading readers to make subconscious assumptions. At times of a big party or small meals, readers can expect alternate personas or the revealing of carefully guarded secrets. When Nick arrives at Gatsby’s parties, he learns to expect that others will wear alternate personas and everyone will accept them. “There is a burst of chatter as the erroneous news goes around that [the Gypsy] is lda Gray’s understudy from the Follies” (41) When people come to Gatsby’s extravagant parties, they can change personalities and identities to have a more crazy, loose time. At these parties, few people care about what people are doing because they’re probably doing the same thing. Ida Gray’s understudy was nearly unrecognizable, but people accepted her “new” personality. In addition to changing different personalities, these large, public parties are also times to show off your wealth. No one is really “invited” to the party, people just arrive. It is a time to mingle with other individuals from a higher stratum. Gatsby’s magnificent library with all the “right books” showed off his good taste, he “…didn’t cut the pages. But what do you want? What do you expect?” (46) Gatsby cares enough to show off the fact that he can afford to buy all these expensive books and exhibits them proudly in his library. However, he didn’t bother to cut his books. This proves that at these parties, people will show off their wealthiness at these large parties where everyone is watching each other, and not care about anything else. Large, public parties like Jay Gatsby’s are quite different from the smaller, intimate meals with very few people. In

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    In ‘The Great Gatsby,’ Fitzgerald frequently demonstrates how isolated his strongest characters are by the world around them through a variety of techniques. Both Nick and Gatsby are presented as being alienated from the world in some way and, as suggested by William Troy, both characters represent two forces in Fitzgerald’s own life – “’intelligent and responsible’ vs. ‘dream ridden romantic.’” He uses symbolism frequently throughout the novel to suggest that this split autobiographical portrayal of his characters is representative of the limbo between “‘power’ and ‘dream’”…

    • 1825 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    In “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald, he uses symbolism in such detailed way. Fitzgerald integrates symbolism into the book so well that it is necessary to read it several times to fully understand it. Maureen Corrigan quotes “Many of us first read it when we were too young to fully comprehend its power.” Even a critic on the book itself had to read the story many times to fully understand all that the book has to offer. Fitzgerald focuses on three main themes in “The Great Gatsby” they are time, loss of appearance, and perspective. Most of the book’s structure is in one of these categories. In order to fully understand the book, we must better understand these three themes.…

    • 1222 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Jay Gatsby, a rich millionaire who lives in the West Egg, longs for his one true love, Daisy Buchanan. Living so far away from his beautiful soulmate, Gatsby lures Daisy into his life by throwing huge parties in order to see her. However, his loneliness continues to swallow him up, no matter how hard Gatsby tries. Most of this emotion comes from Fitzgerald himself. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s own life contributes to the making of many of his novels, but The Great Gatsby shows the reader the party life Fitzgerald lived in his time, and how this lifestyle contributed to his writings and his career.…

    • 812 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Great Gatsby Symbolism

    • 295 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The symbols in the Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald in chapters 6-9 suggest that not everything is always as it seems and people may believe they know the whole truth, but that is not always the case. In chapter 6 of the Great Gatsby, everyone created a false sense of happiness in their lives, but in reality no one, but the eyes of Doctor T.J Eckleburg were the only ones that saw the harsh truth. T.J Eckleburg's eyes symbolizes that not everyone knows the whole truth but the eyes of Eckleburg, and that his eyes are always watching... “over the ashheaps the giant eyes of T.J Eckleburg kept their vigil” (Fitzgerald 124). The illusion is that there is always someone watching, but the reality is that just because it seems someone is watching…

    • 295 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is an English classic that focuses on one man’s struggle with love in relation to the economic and societal conflicts that take place during the 1920s in New York City. Throughout the novel, Fitzgerald shifts between explaining the life of the main character and his desire for love, wealth, and purpose to the social hierarchy that pressures him to change his identity so that he may be truly accepted into society. Although the main character changes his identity and acquires enough money to live an affluent lifestyle, he is not considered to be part of the highest social class. Location tends to play an important role throughout the course of the novel. In Gatsby’s case, it is one of the main things that separates him, not only physically, but socially, from his lover.…

    • 1433 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Great Style of Gatsby

    • 557 Words
    • 2 Pages

    I personally enjoy that limitation since it forces the reader to think about what they just read and connect it to his story telling.…

    • 557 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    rhetorical analysis

    • 1494 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Gatsby lived his American dream and in the end found his heart flooded by the power of love and its remarkable betrayal. In time, the clothes we decide to wear, or the objects we put faith into are but beautiful masks covering broken creatures. The desires Gatsby longs for, force him to remember the past in hope of strengthening the dimming light of Daisy’s love. Gatsby’s life gives way to circumstances that connect two separate ideas in ways least expected. In Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby the morals of people are challenged through the use of flashbacks, symbolism, and irony in order to depict the dissimilarities of the social classes.…

    • 1494 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Pattern In The Great Gatsby

    • 2465 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Memory, symbol, and pattern affect the reading of literature by making it easier for readers to understand what’s going on in a literary work. While reading, readers begin to notice the trend or pattern in the devices that they recognize such as themes or symbols. When reading literature, readers tend to recall certain events or small parts from other parts of literature from what they’re reading currently. The recognition of patterns make it easier to read complicated literature by completely comprehending the intended message that withholds in the literary work. A time when my appreciation of a literary work was enhanced by understanding symbol and or pattern was when reading The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.…

    • 2465 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Great Gatsby Symbolism

    • 1114 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The Great Gatsby, written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, is a novel filled with symbolism with different meanings. The Great Gatsby is written in Nick Carraway’s perspective, who was once Gatsby’s neighbor in West Egg. The story begins when Carraway moves into West Egg from the Midwest to seek out his fortune as a bond salesman. Nick then meets Gatsby on his dock long towards West Egg from East Egg. With the help of Nick, Gatsby finally reunites with his past love, Daisy Buchanan, who is married to Tom Buchanan. The twisted love story ends with a tragedy of Gatsby dying thinking Daisy chose him over Tom, which sadly was not the case. In the Great Gatsby, the character Daisy represents many of the symbolisms between all the men in the story.…

    • 1114 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Great Gatsby Metaphors

    • 612 Words
    • 3 Pages

    "When ill luck begins, it does not come in sprinkles, but in showers" - Mark Twain…

    • 612 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Leaning on the black knotted tree a couple yards from the edge of my property, I had a spectacular view of Gatsby’s front lawn. His dark green, perfectly cut lawn stretched out for what looked like acres, with his light grey driveway slicing it in half. Parked there was his shiny black Rolls-Royce. Every Wednesday afternoon, a group of men came to his house to clean it, so that its polished black exterior shone. His car was a frequent sight on weekends, leaving and returning to his house with more and more guests, all with the same aim of partying, gossiping, and drinking. On one weekend in the beginning of July, I decided to attend another of Gatsby’s parties. He had informed me when we’d gone to Coney Island the previous Tuesday night, that I was welcome to come to any one of his parties and needed no formal invitation. As I crossed into his garden that weekend, I saw the familiar sight of clusters of men and women leaning in to each other to whisper secrets and laughing as they had another drink. I spotted Jordan across the lawn, looking beautiful in a long, black dress, and she signaled to me to join her. She was with a man who appeared to be in his late thirties, and his wife, a woman in a pale blue dress who looked around the same age as her husband.…

    • 493 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Fitzgerald illustrates that futility in Gatsby’s life by exemplifying the pointlessness in materialism. Fitzgerald contrasts the extravagance within Gatsby’s parties with the ‘casual innuendo and introductions forgotten on the spot’, suggesting the fruitlessness of materialism and the pursuit of materialistic possessions. This is further amplified in the chapter when Gatsby’s guests disregard him. Nick…

    • 525 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Last week, I attended one of Jay Gatsby’s lavish parties. It was almost exactly like I imagined it. The raucous women, the greedy guests, the whiskey, the fashion – it was quite the experience. I never received an invitation, but no one truly appeared to have one either. However, the biggest mystery of the party was the fact that Jay Gatsby was never seen. After all, one of the core reasons I had decided to attend the party was to meet him. I left the celebration around 2:00 AM after I lost my hopes. This was a major problem. If you are the host, you should welcome people casually inside your home – do not invite crummy people carelessly looking for sex into the event. As tension of Gatsby’s activities arose, so did the emotion of the people I was surrounded by. “I looked around. Most of the remaining women were now having fights with men said to be their husbands. Even Jordan’s party, the quarter from East Egg, were rent asunder by dissension” (Fitzgerald 51). If Gatsby would have made an appearance, the fighting might have stopped because people would have been more interested in the events. The insanity of it all was generally due to the mass quantity of alcohol consumed. People kept drinking, dancing, gambling, gossiping, and more. Where was Gatsby during all of this? Why would he throw an extravagant party and not attend? Many others wondered where he was, and thus decided it would be a great time to gossip about him. I couldn’t help but eavesdrop on them a little. “‘Somebody told me they thought he killed a man once.’ … ‘I don’t think it’s so much as that,’ argued Lucille skeptically; ‘it’s more that he was a German spy during the war” (Fitzgerald 44). I heard he was a German spy, he killed a man, even studied at Oxford, but what is true? Certainly, all of the gossip wouldn’t be happening if he had decided to make an entrance at the bash. Don’t get me wrong, the party was impeccable – the only…

    • 363 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In Fitzgerlad’s “The Great Gatsby”, the reader knows Wolfsheim is related to organized crime in the 1920’s and is associated with Herman Rosenthal and his illegal gambling operations, which is supported by the facts presented in “The New York Times” as well as Wolfsheim’s quotes from the book.…

    • 697 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    One of the reasons that Gatsby has become so famous around New York is that he throws elaborate parties every weekend at his mansion, lavish spectacles to which people long to be invited. I made the short walk to Gatsby’s house and joined the festivities, feeling somewhat out of place amid the crowd of ecstatic strangers.…

    • 2218 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays