The Great Gatsby - Is Gatsby Great?

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Is Gatsby great or not?

Section 1:

Gatsby is generous to the people at his parties. He throws banquets and spends a lot of money on food, preparations and entertainment. Gatsby is a generous host. “most people were brought”

“Every Friday five crates of oranges and lemons arrived from a fruiterer in New York--every Monday these same oranges and lemons left his back door in a pyramid of pulpless halves.”

“At least once a fortnight a corps of caterers came down with several hundred feet of canvas and enough colored lights to make a Christmas tree of Gatsby's enormous garden. On buffet tables, garnished with glistening hors-d'oeuvre, spiced baked hams crowded against salads of harlequin designs and pastry pigs and turkeys bewitched to a dark gold. In the main hall a bar with a real brass rail was set up, and stocked with gins and liquors and with cordials so long forgotten that most of his female guests were too young to know one from another.”

“By seven o'clock the orchestra has arrived--no thin five-piece affair but a whole pitful of oboes and trombones and saxophones and viols and cornets and piccolos and low and high drums.”

He is generous to the man living in his house.

“A man named Klipspringer was there so often and so long that he became known as "the boarder"--I doubt if he had any other home.”

Lets people just come to his parties even though they are not invited.

“People were not invited--they went there.”

Whether the people he is entertaining are worth entertaining – hence becomes a weakness.

“they conducted themselves according to the rules of behavior associated with amusement parks”

Gatsby is also generous to his father

“He come out to see me two years ago and bought me the house I live in now.”
“And ever since he made a success he was very generous with me”

Gatsby is loyal to his father. Coming from a poor background and becoming wealthy he has not forgotten his father.

Gatsby has never let Nick down.
His

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