The Great Awakening

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When analyzing the Migration and Settlement of how and why people adapted and transformed to the new social and physical environment can be shown in a number of ways. First, vagabonds, rogues and other criminals were transformed into become solid citizens. Second, the adaptation of farmers in the South and how they transformed their social and physical environment with the purchase of slaves. Finally, the religious boom of the Great Awakening and how it transformed many people social and physical environment.

The criminals, rogues, and vagabonds that were all shipped across the Atlantic as indentured servants came to escape England. In England they were viewed down upon so coming to the New World was a great choice and as they
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Nash explains that the lower classed people began to be told that they were in their own hand and did not have to worry about the elite members of the clergy. Lower class citizens found this true and lead to them adapting social to the environment more freely. This led to class being changed, roles being defied, and the transformation of the religious society. The lower class then assumed the higher roles that were “reserved” for the adult men and became more educated. The Great Awakening was more than religious earthquake, Nash said, it was a time that individualism really began to rise. People started to adapt on their own and led to many finding their own …show more content…
The criminals, vogues, and rogues turned to religion which helped them become solid citizens. This change in their lifestyle lifted them up in the social classes and they began to create their own successes. Farmers adapted by planting the most wanted cash crop, sugar, then as every farmer began to plant sugar labor became a huge need for more success. With the purchasing of slaves, small farming transformed into giant plantations because it was much easier to become wealthier off of the free labor from slaves. Southern farmers transformed the social classes by the wealthiest to the poorest and the more slaves owned was more to the fewer slaves owned. Then physically farmers enlarged plantations tremendously because of the higher income. The Great Awakening turned social classification upside-down by showing the lower classes that were in their own hands and did not need to rely on the elite. Classes, roles, and social structure was defied and transformed to new ways. As shown people adapted and transformed their social and physical environment in the New World in a number of different

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